7 Days of Wild Christmas: day 5 cutting the damage

Not all the wild acts involved in the Wild Life Trusts initiative involve getting outside. Some encourage looking closer to home at our impact on the environment.

One of the wild acts I started on back as part of 30 days wild was to start using more eco-friendly products. We use Tesco’s own brand Eco-Active products to cut down the harmful chemicals we are washing down the drains.

Amy attended an Norwex cleaning party earlier in the year and shifted to an alternative wash powder. A bit like an old-fashioned tupaware party women are encouraged into a pyramid scheme of selling eco products. The enviro cloth is supposed to cut down the need for surface sprays and the need for kitchen roll that adds to landfill. The silver it contains is supposed to act as a microbial agent and reduce the smell of the cloth. They claim to remove 99.9% of bacteria. These claims are clearly nonsense as is their faith in silver. However, it does wipe well and we have no werewolves in the kitchen as a bonus.

Also from Norwex, we changed to their laundry detergent. This doesn’t contain as many bulking agents or harmful chemicals as normal detergents. The Norwex speel is that normal wash powders contain unnecessary chemicals designed just to make bubbles to convince you they are doing their jobs. Norwex has no scent which was the biggest change using it. We add a few drops of essential oils to it so the washing comes out with that fresh wash smell. It does do the job though. Clothes come out feeling clean and we haven’t had any issues of allergies.

In the bathroom, we started to use eco-friendly spray and toilet cleaner. The toilet cleaner isn’t really as powerful as standard bleach. But it isn’t supposed to be causing as much damage polluting our waterways.

Amy made the shift back to bars of soap for washing with in the shower. Though we haven’t been as good with this one as other steps we took. These soap bars came in cardboard packaging with paper wrapping rather than the plastic liquid soaps come in of the plastic wrap many soap bars have. So right down to the packaging, it pushes better eco credentials.

Then the must-have eco product of 2018, the water bottle. I’ve never really bought mineral water in one use bottles. I’ve used reusable bottles for a long time as a tight fisted Yorkshire resident. At work, I try to keep my self hydrated through the day and this has lasted me a good while.

Within the gardening industry, there is a lot of plastic waste. This has been examined well within Gardener’s World this year with Monty cutting down the waste at Longmeadow. One product I’ve bought to cut this back is a Burgon & Ball pot maker. These make paper pots to start my seedlings in.

It doesn’t look exactly like the product photos as the photos from the site show a metal cap on the top, which this doesn’t have. This won’t affect the functionality of it though. The reason I bought this one over several of the competitors was that it makes 3 different sizes while many just do one.

These might only be little steps in cutting my damage to the world, but every step helps. The more people buy eco-products, the more it sends a message that people want to make a difference. Then they become more readily available until they become the norm. If you’ve bought a real Christmas tree this year here is an interesting article on how these trees could be put to use after the Christmas period.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-46647790

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