12 Days Wild: Day 7-New Year’s Eve

The day started very cold again. The back door was very stiff to slide open. But, it’s been nice sitting in the backroom and seeing the birds enjoy the extra bird feeders. They are obviously appreciating the food in the cold weather with large swarms coming in.

A good day to steal Amy’s macro lens for a few close up photos. I have a suspicion that all this frost is probably going to destroy the camellias emerging blooms but so it goes. I think it’s going to get dug out after its next round of flowers.

The colour of the Golden King holly almost concealed by frost.

It has stayed cool enough that the frost hasn’t really faded. We didn’t get out until after lunch and there was still lots of ice around. Alice wanted to go to the park to play hide and seek and look for more robins to show her robin toy.

Alice all wrapped up with her favourite new hat.

We did manage to find a robin over by the church wall. The wall here is covered in moss and ivy and you can usually find a good few birds hopping in and out of the cover.

Alice with her robin.

We spotted a squirrel which Alice told me is robin’s brother. It’s an interesting family tree.

I’m glad we are getting some decent sunny days before we head back to school. It is freezing but it’s still a tolerable temperature once we are wrapped up. But we are lucky to have numerous nice spots to walk out too. We will not be doing anything special for New Year’s Eve. Even if there weren’t restrictions in place New Year’s Eve isn’t much fun when you know you’ll still get woken up the same time as normal by a 4-year-old. So, normal bedtime for us. But I hope you all manage to welcome the New Year in safely and enjoy whatever you are up to.

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12 Days Wild: Day 6 late finish and early start

Last night was the last full moon of this year. A ‘cold moon’. The evening started very cloudy and it wasn’t looking very hopeful for taking a decent photograph so I played with shadows.

But about 15 minutes later the cloud cover had blown over and I got a clear shot. Well worth going out for a few minutes in the cold.

Then I had an early start with a run along the seafront. It was very cold this morning but the seafront paths don’t freeze as easily with the salt spray. The cold weather isn’t so much of an issue as you get up to heat quickly enough once running. The sunrise was stunning over Mappleton in the distance. I started running again during lockdown but I sprained my ankle when I got to the last week of couch to 5K so I left running while it recovered. I’m starting slow again.

And then at the end of my run over the fields at the other end of town.

Later on in the day, I took a little time to watch the bird feeders. I have set up the extra bird feeding station for winter. I put this up during the winter months the birds need it more. The rest of the year I just keep two feeder poles and a few extra in the trees.

Through the day I’ve had the reminder of why I don’t bother with these stations most of the year. They are shorter than the others so the seagulls attack them. They have shredded metal feeders in the past. They can become very destructive and it puts the other birds off.

But as the day has gone on I’ve seen a few other birds use it with tits and starlings visiting lots. The sparrows are pretty much a constant garden presence.

After the initial run it has been a peaceful day of resting and revising for my RHS exam. I’ve just about got all my revision notes in order and been recapping all the details. There is a lot to take in and I’m taking 2 exams next time so I don’t know that I’ll manage the commendation again. But we’ll see. Still a month to go before I sit it.

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12 Days of Wild: Day 5-Graveyard walk

Today I wanted to head out along Polly’s Path. It is a little path that leads alongside one of the town’s graveyards and it is one of the best spots for seeing birds. At this time of year, the mass of trees and hedges are filled with berries making it an irresistible lure for wildlife. It is, however, very boggy. I imagine the corpses decompose well as it spends a lot of time water-logged.

I wanted to give Alice a chance to use her camera and she wanted to take her new robin toy to see some more of its friends. Her backpack now fits more comfortably so she can take some of her own possessions.

On entering the graveyard we were met by a great variety of birds with blackbirds, tits, finches and pigeons staying close while several corvids flew off. Graveyards are often great spots for wildlife with badgers often making sets nearby.

Alice got to see plenty of the robins she wanted.

And a good few squirrels.

Her own camera isn’t quite up to scratch but it allows her to feel like she’s taking part in mine and Amy’s hobby.

Though she got a good selfie.

The graveyard leads through to the Transpennine Trail. It’s quite a while since I last took Alice down this way but it is a nice walk. The path is sunken down from the graveyard and surrounding fields making it feel quite calm and secluded.

This does come with the disadvantage that all the water runs down into it. A few more days of rain and it will be the Transpennine Canal. But, that does make for good splashing fun while Alice sang bear hunt.

The birds were equally evident along here with a mass of different songbirds enjoying the berries.

While we didn’t go a massive distance it still felt good to get out and see so many different birds. Most were common birds that visit our own garden but it was still nice to see so many and get out for a stroll. The wet conditions mean we didn’t have to fight through crowds which currently is a bit of a novelty around Hornsea with many people coming for the beach. Hope you’re all enjoying that strange half-life time between Christmas and New Year and managing some time enjoying whatever you like to do.

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12 Days Wild: Day 4-Bird watching at the park

Today was a very frosty start. The day began in the minuses. The garden was crisp and frosty registering a -2. It hasn’t warmed up massively through the day. It has stayed very low all day. But it is sunny and still felt like a good day to get out. I was considering planting the last few bulbs but minus temperatures are not the weather for that job.

The birdbath needed the ice breaking again. We are getting a good number of birds visiting currently though not much variety.

We enjoyed a few rounds of bug bingo. She’s quite enjoying it now and it’s interesting to see how she spots the similarities between different cards. I discovered a documentary on an Inuit hunter, ‘The last igloo‘. It seemed suitable viewing for the cold weather and since Alice enjoyed her igloo den so much. We watched the first half of the show and Alice was fascinated by the huskies and igloos.

I didn’t want to spend the whole day in though as while it was cold it might be one of the dryer days of the holiday with rain forecast. I wanted to go an pick up some more bird food to keep them going in the cold weather and try and encourage a few different birds into the garden. We wrapped up in every layer and headed out across the park.

The park gets water-logged pretty easily and you can see why we don’t have a top league football team when this is the state of the pitch.

It is, however, great for birds as most of the time they live a safe existence where they are left undisturbed. We had come prepared with our binoculars. The tits and finches were out. Alice still insists on using her binoculars back to front as they are more comfortable this way.

We enjoyed a few games of hide and seek. Alice insisted on playing as she said it would improve her counting.

We successfully made it to get some more bird food and Alice got a robin from the discounted Christmas stock. She’s very happy with it and has sat cuddling it back at home.

Now we are all set with extra bird food we can get that set for the birds tomorrow. I currently have birdseed and sunflower hearts out but I like to provide a greater variety of food as the weather gets colder to encourage different birds into the garden. We are building up for the RSPB big garden birdwatch next month and it’s nice to see how many species of birds we can get into a relatively small space. More on our bird feeding efforts tomorrow.

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12 Days Wild: Day 3-A walk out

We are up to day 3 of 12 days wild and it was time to get back outside. We’ve had two days largely inside and that’s pretty much my limit. It was only a short walk out but it felt good to shake off the cobwebs.

We are very lucky to live by the sea and it is a short walk to the seafront. Today was a gorgeous winter day with blue seas and views out to Flamborough.

At several sites along the coast, these recycle bins have been placed. Alice loves to check it out each time and sometimes asks to save recyclable rubbish to put in it.

Next to it is a sign explaining how long it takes for rubbish to decompose. It is a shocking amount of time but despite many of the schemes we still end up having to do beach cleans. The number of years are too big really for Alice to comprehend but she knows it isn’t good. If a 4-year-old can understand there is no excuse for anyone else. There are bins every 20m probably. The seagulls can be a pain and pull things out but much of the rubbish is just pure laziness.

Preaching over. As it was a lovely day just about everyone else had decided to get out for a walk along the seafront. The car parks were rammed. I don’t begrudge people wanting to visit but I felt a bit hemmed in so we headed away to the memorial gardens.

And Alice found a cousin to play with for a little bit.

It was only a short walk but I think it did us all good to walk off some of our food from the last few days and feel some sun on our skin. A lazy evening ahead of games and reading. I am reading Merlin Sheldrake’s entangled life which is fascinating. It is all about fungi which in the grand scheme of human knowledge we still know little about. I also got an alert to tell me the new Monty Don had dropped to 99p on Kindle. I’ve been interested to read but didn’t really want to pay full price. This looks to be Monty’s efforts at talking about nature and wildlife gardening. I have quite a few very good books on the subject so I’m not expecting anything new but figure it will be an easy read alongside my RHS revision. The reviews have been very critical as they say he defends fox hunting which isn’t going to win him any fans amongst environmental readers. But we’ll see when I read it whether it is any good. At 99p I don’t mind if it doesn’t turn out to be amazing.

I read a few of Alice’s new books with her sat in her den set. We read Nicola Davies-Last: the story of a white rhino. Despite her face, in this photo, it did quite upset her hearing about how animals are becoming extinct.  This isn’t a book that is going to be a regular bedtime read but it introduces that idea of animals endangered to promote our need to care for the natural world. It sparked a lot of conversation from her which was the point. We want Alice growing up aware of our need to be stewards of the natural world. I am a fan of Nicola Davies books with the promise being one of my favourites of recent years.

I hope you’re all managing alright and not suffered too much with storms the last few days. It hasn’t been particularly bad here despite warnings. Hopefully, you’re all keeping well and got a chance to get outside today.

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12 Days Wild: day 2-bug bingo

Yesterday was day 2 of the Wildlife Trust’s 12 days wild. The scheme aims to get people out in nature and help people connect to nature and improve their mental health. I was pleased, yesterday, that my six on Saturday post on mental health and gardening received lots of positive feedback. I was happy people got some pleasure from it.

We spent much of yesterday just chilling. Alice took stock of what she had received for Christmas and she had more of a chance to enjoy it. She wanted to spend most of the day playing games. She received a chess set from her grandparents. So, she is now desperate to learn to play. I need some nature therapy after each lesson as it isn’t the easiest game to teach a 4-year-old. But, she is full of enthusiasm. Ludo was pretty frustrating for her as it takes quite a while to play and she kept getting sent back to the start. Uno junior makes for a good quick burst and it’s a game with can put in the rucksack for when we do go out on adventures. Suited to a quick game in a cafe while waiting for food. Or will be when we can actually return to cafes and restaurants. On the ‘acts of wild’ side of things, we played bug bingo. This was enjoyable and simple enough for us to play straight out of the box. The illustrations are lovely and it helps teach us the names of many different bugs. We looked up a few that captured her imagination afterwards to learn more. It was quite long and while we do play games to teach patience and turn-taking I may play it with her as the first to get five or ten initially to keep her attention. I’d rather play several rounds of the game than have one big game that loses her interest. The bugs come from around the world. In an ideal world, I would prefer an edition which just covered UK bugs that we are likely to see. My approach to the natural world is very parochial. I am mainly interested in the nature within our own patch. Corona Virus has only strengthened this with us being limited to our locality. But enough of the bugs are UK based for it to still teach her about the names of UK bugs and foster an interest in them.

Having bought one nature game I am now seeing lots of recommendations for other nature games through my online advertising. There are many variants of the bingo for the nature lover. There is a jungle, bird, dinosaur, cat, dog, monkey and ocean bingo. There is even a poo bingo which if I’d seen first I probably would have bought as she is at the age where poo is hilarious. I saw it first looks to be another simple game for seeing the great variety of life out there. Match the leaf looks like one I could do with to help teach me to match the leaves and trees. It even includes the Latin and common names so could help with my RHS course. It also comes in many varieties with a flower version, a bird version, paw prints and more. There are a wealth of nature games out there suited to any age now.

I hope you’ve all had good Boxing Days and now the main days of gluttony are done you find a chance to start getting back outside. We had yellow weather warnings last night but it didn’t sound too horrific out there. But, I will need to check the garden for damage as it gets a bit lighter. Enjoy your days.

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Six on Saturday: 26.12.20 Staying positive

I hope you have all had a good Christmas even with tier restrictions. We had a super day, even without visitors. We very slowly opened presents. Alice had a lovely day with many fabulous presents from friends and family. I got a few gifts for my outside lifestyle but nothing so much on the gardening front. But I hadn’t asked for anything so didn’t expect to. Alice received a few gardening gifts. Mainly craft activities: paint your own birdhouses and fairy gardens. So, I’m sure they will feature over the next few weeks.

It seems like the last few weeks there have been many of the six on Saturday posts mentioning how they are struggling for motivation to garden. Then with the news on changes to tiers in the UK, I know many people’s mental health has spiralled further down. This combined with many people suffering from seasonal affective disorder (SAD) is leaving many people across social media stating that they are struggling. So, for this weeks six I am looking at six things which have helped me recently.

1. Get outside

Getting outside has been shown to improve mental wellbeing again and again. Ideally during daylight hours but even getting outside at night in a semi-natural setting has been shown in some studies to help. If you don’t have access to an outside space a windowbox or houseplants have been shown to have some mood-lifting capability but I don’t really think it’s a substitute for getting out properly. It can be an effort to drag yourself out currently but having the right clothing helps keep you out once you get out. I keep a set of cheap waterproof trousers by the back door which are more than adequate for most gardening jobs. The Gold Leaf dry touch gloves are my go-to in winter as my clay soil can become pretty horrible this time of year. Buffs for neck warmth and a hat are more convenient for warmth than a big scarf. But once you get doing most jobs outside you warm up quickly enough.

2. Aim low

It helps to aim for just getting small manageable jobs done on each trip out in the garden. If you’re trying to get out and do everything your mood will end up lower. But if you go out with just the aim of planting say 10 bulbs, pruning one plant, you have more chance of succeeding and coming away feeling satisfied. I aimed to get my Iris reticulata planted a few weeks back. It took about ten minutes. They were all bunged in pots but I came away feeling better for having gone outside with a small definite aim in mind that was achieved.

3. Don’t be hard on yourself

If you don’t get jobs done it doesn’t really matter. Worst-case scenarios for most gardening jobs is a slightly less impressive display of something the year after. So long as the job being left isn’t endangering anyone there is no need to place pressure on yourself. It is unlikely our gardens are going to be enjoyed by anyone much beyond our own households anytime soon. So, there is no need to beat yourself up if jobs don’t get done. I have alliums that have been sat in a cupboard for a good while. They have been left while other jobs have been completed. I will get them in the ground probably in the next week. It may be too late it may not be. Doesn’t matter. These irises were meant to be going around the hostas in pots but I haven’t got around to it so they just went in small pots. I haven’t even bothered to tip them out of their plastic pot. They’ll still give some flowers.

4. Celebrate what is there

I have tried to plan the garden to ensure there is something in flower throughout the year. Currently, the stars are the cyclamen. The hellebores should be stunning but they’ve been nibbled quite a bit. There are a few Irises that will be flowering over the next month. But if you look there will be something worth celebrating even if it is just frost on leaves or the stark beauty of bare branches against a winter sky. Celebrate what is going on.

5. Grow evergreen

To avoid the garden looking too stark over winter I have quite a lot of pockets of evergreen planting hidden around the garden. For much of the year, it isn’t visible but as the herbaceous perennials die back the ferns and heuchera are revealed. The hollies come into their own. The evergreen shrubs provide structure over the winter. It just keeps the garden looking that bit lusher over the darker months so you don’t find yourself looking at a full garden in decay. This shaded corner is filled with evergreen ferns and heuchera. They have browned off a bit but they still provide a solid block of green to lift the spirit.

On a side note, as this is the time of year people go for nostalgic posts, the 3 large ferns at the back were amongst the first plants I planted when we moved in. They were tiny little things, maybe 20-30cm big. Now well over a metre.

6. Enjoy the wildlife

With many of the trees bare the birds become much more visible in winter. This combined with food sources gradually dwindling bird feeders become more important. If you do provide feeders keep them clean as a disease can be spread easily in winter and make sure you keep them stocked. If they are empty birds waste energy visiting. Watching the birds in winter provides endless joy. I usually increase my feeders at this time of year in preparation for the RSPB Big Garden Birdwatch. By providing a variety of food and water sources I get to enjoy many different birds coming into the garden.

If you fancy reading more on gardening for improving mental health check out these two books:

The well gardened mind.

RHS: your wellbeing garden

If you fancy some gentle viewing watch the National Gardening scheme lecture with Tom & Sue Stuart-Smith. It supports a wonderful charity that then gives onto many worthy causes.

NGS lecture.

It is also day 2 of the Wildlife Trust initiative ‘12 days wild‘. This aims to get people to appreciate nature in these dark months to improve mood. Well worth signing up and looking through their ideas. Check out yesterday’s blog.

We have another day of rest ahead for boxing day. We’ll be taking it slow. I hope you all enjoy your weekend whatever you are doing.

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12 Days wild: day 1

Today is the start of the Wildlife Trusts 12 Days wild initiative. In the dark days after Christmas, many peoples moods drop with Christmas done and the dark days. 12 days wild aims to get people involved in nature. They share some ideas on the website and some more if you register. I’ve taken part the last two years and I’ve found it nice to take part in some of the activities to give focus to the holidays. It helps get us outside and create lasting memories in nature. If you’ve got bored children it can give some ideas or if you’re just feeling down it can help. You can take part through social media with the hashtag #12dayswild There is a great online nature community there supporting each other.

Today was obviously a busy day with Christmas. We have had a lovely day and I may talk more about our day in a future blog but I’m going to focus on our 12 days wild today. There wasn’t much time to get outside but I did pop out first thing to top up the bird feeders and crack the ice on the birdbaths. As the weather gets colder and natural food sources scarcer the feeders see more visitors. The birdbath has seen many birds gathering today as they may not have been able to access many of their usual water spots.

Apart from that and trips to the compost heaps, the day has largely been spent inside. I am not going to go through everything we received but I will share a few of the nature-themed presents we received. Amy was given this beautiful bee decoration from my parents. She is becoming a bit of a crazy bee lady. In her younger years, she amassed a collection of cat ornaments. Now people seem to want to get her bees. Possibly after our wedding. But she got a good few bee gifts for her birthday earlier in the month and she got a few more today.

This is a gift I bought for Alice. There are several nature-themed bingo sets by the same company but I liked the look of this one. It’s a simple enough game for a 4-year-old while also teaching us the names of many bugs. It should make for a good act of wild even if we are stuck in.

My Aunty Dot works for Bodleian publishing so I received these gorgeous books. I had seen she’d been involved with the gin book. Chris’s illustrations are stunning I have a few of his other books and this looks like a nice one for dipping into. The bird anthology has a great mix of excerpts and poetry for flicking through. Some nice winter nature reads.

And Amy treated me to a Stanley flask. However, she didn’t realise she had bought XXL so she bought me a smaller thermos for smaller outings. These will be great for our walks for filling with tea and soup. Our current ones just didn’t keep the heat whereas the Stanley ones are rated as some of the best. It doubles as a bludgeon in a survival situation. It is pretty solid. I may need a bigger rucksack to go with it.

We have been very fortunate to still have a lovely Christmas this year, even if we can’t see family. But we would rather leave family safe than expose them to risk when we may have a vaccine in the not-so-distant future. We have had good quality family time in our household. Playing games, sharing Alice’s toys and building things. Each year I always end up reflecting on how lucky we are, but we are. We live in a lovely community in a gorgeous area. We are very blessed. Hopefully, over the next 11 days, I can share some of the wild acts we do as part of 12 days wild. Here is one final picture of Alice hiding in her new den building set.

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Six on Saturday: 19.12.20

So, made it to the end of my first term in my new nursery. I’m still enjoying my time there immensely but it is time for a break. We have been getting into the festive mood at home with some garden craft. I received my last RHS assignment back and got almost full marks, so that was a nice little boost mid-week.

1. Christmas wreath

After Amy’s success with her autumn wreath she has gone onto do a lovely Christmas one. She bought it as a kit with choices over the colour scheme. By next year we might have enough foliage from our own garden to do one.

2. Hanging basket

Amy had done such a good job of the wreath I felt I needed to update the hanging basket. I had filled it with fuchsia grown from cuttings. These had gone past their best now. I made use of one of the discount heuchera from a few weeks back, a cyclamen that was hiding under a shrub and some self-seeded ivy from the back. Hanging baskets don’t do too well with our sea winds but it will bring a temporary burst of cheer. Then the plants can be taken out to recover in the border.

The cyclamen is a nice festive red.

The ivy is a lightly veined type. Looking at it together I probably could have done with one of the plants having darker foliage but it is looking alright.

3. Pyracantha ‘orange glow’

I’ve added a pyracantha to grow up the fence. It’s a spiky plant with evergreen leaves. Its main purpose is to provide berries for the birds. There won’t be any this year but it should provide some next year. The berries are bright orange and are particularly popular with finches. I’m trying to provide more natural food sources to supplement the bird feeders I already put out. The honeysuckle is well established and gets picked over. I have cotoneaster that is still quite small but should contribute eventually. The holly golden king has provided a few berries this year but it will be many years before that provides any serious bounty for the birds. Whereas, the pyracantha will look attractive and provide relatively quickly.

Quite a thorny plant but it is at the back of the border out of harm’s way.

4. David Austin rose ‘Peter Pan’

This is the last of my treats for my exam result and completing my last assignment. I need to include more roses within the plant profiles I write for my RHS level 2 so I decided I would get a David Austin rose. I settled for Peter Pan, a small dark red flower with dark leaves. It doesn’t look like much now but hopefully, this will be a good repeat flowering rose for the patio. It was bought bare rooted. Roses are easier to transplant in winter when dormant. You find there is a better range available and they are usually slightly cheaper.

5. Ilex x meserveae ‘Blue Angel’

This is a perfect little holly. While many hollies are sold on the fact that they are spineless or low on spines that isn’t really the holly you want in the festive season. It is a cross between English Ilex Aquifolium and Japanese Ilex Rugosa The leaves have a lovely dark green colour with a good shine. It is fairly compact growing up to about 4m but this will take quite a long time. It can be pruned into hedges or topiary. It has the RHS perfect for pollinators award and it forms berries for the birds. A great little wildlife addition. This isn’t in the ground but may replace the camellia. I don’t really like the double blooms of the camellia. The camellia doesn’t really offer many benefits to wildlife and that was part of what got me into gardening. This also suits the conditions of my garden better.

6. Ilex x Meserveae ‘Blue Prince’

However, ‘blue angel’ is no good on its own as hollies are dioecious. They have a gender. Blue angel is a female holly so in order to get the berries a male needs to be nearby. That is where ‘Blue Prince’ comes in. This is a male holly which will form the flowers, to fertilise ‘blue angel’, but not the berries. Some descriptions of the plant online say it will form berries, but I believe these are inaccurate. It has an award from the European boxwood and topiary society. They are both tolerant of sea winds and clay soil making them good choices for me in theory. This has been planted near the shed replacing a patch of thuggish hardy geranium that was getting out of control. It should form a nice block of evergreen foliage that blocks line of sight to the bare back fence. It will also act to some degree as a windbreak for some of the surrounding plants.

I have managed a few garden jobs this week. A few more bulbs have made it in the ground but I still have more to go. Hopefully, now I am off work I’ll be able to get back on top of the garden jobs. The garden isn’t looking too bad but it could do with some attention to get it back on track. I leave a lot of the perennials over winter for wildlife to shelter in but a few are in need of a cut back as there are other plants coming through for winter that are hidden by the dying growth. I have Lou Nicholls talk on auriculars to enjoy this weekend. This may leave me with a desire for auriculas.

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Six on Saturday-12.12.20-cold and frosty morning

This week we had the first proper burst of frost. This week’s six are almost all plants that have featured regularly but they take on a different appearance with the frost.

1. Hydrangea paniculata ‘Little lime’

This has retained its colour for a long time. It’s a smaller version of limelight and I have it growing in a pot currently. Hydrangea flowerheads look great with frost on and the combination of lime green with the icy edging is an attractive one.

2. Heuchera purple palace

The heuchera often stand out in the frost with the veining becoming more pronounced. Here purple palace was looking very nice with the frost along the stems.

3. Sea holly

This sea holly has held onto its colour beautifully this year. It was quite late to flower but it must have been on the go for about 2 or 3 months now. The flowerheads were starting to drip when I got out.

4. Dryopteris sieboldii

I really like the fronds of this fern. It forms single leaves spaced alternatively along the stem. Similar to the holly ferns but with a more spreading growth pattern rather than upright.

5. Dryopteris possibly filix-mas

This fern was dug out of my parents front garden when they were having their drive way changed. It was a beast and hard work getting out with my mums blunt spade. I haven’t had the chance to take a file to her spade with Covid but it is more of a bludgeoning tool than the cutting tool it’s meant to be. I’m pretty sure it is a form of Dryopteris but not certain of which. Possibly filix-mas, possibly affinis. Either way it’s a nice a big fern filling out a space to the side of the lillac. It gets sun first thing in the morning and then is in increasing shade through the rest of the day. I like the way the frost settles on the edges of the fronds.

6. Hydrangea macrophyla

This is one of two hydrangeas that frame the steps down to the garden. These have lost their colour, fading from pink to brown. They are lovely even as they fade. They always look good with a layer of frost on. These will be cut back in late winter to encourage more flower buds, along with cutting out dead growth.

We have Alice’s ballet lessons starting again today. I did consider going back past the garden centre then remembered it’s Christmas and it will be hell on earth. So we’ll give that a miss. I am finishing off replanting the hanging basket. The fuschias were looking a bit tired. I’ve got a few winter plants to replace them with. Hopefully look a bit better. Hope you enjoy your weekends.

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