Six on Saturday: 4.9.21 In-laws garden

Well this has been a good week for my gardening and horticultural interests. I recieved my RHS exam results and I passed the two units I took back in June, recieving a commendation for the soil unit. So, that’s all good. Then we’ve been away to the in-laws who have a lovely garden to enjoy. We even managed a garden visit to Burton Agnes on the way back which was nice to see. I’ve been for the snowdrops and for Halloween but never made it in Summer. I’ve finished my current RHS assignment on plant choice. I just need to write the plant profiles that go with each assignment. My next exam is on propagation so I figure I’ll be taking lots of cuttings to secure the knowledge. If you missed it, I wrote about heuchera yesterday including the propagation methods suitable for them. This week’s six is coming from the in-laws garden.

The apples

They have apples grown in a few different ways, including cordons along the path. But the shed apples were the stand out apples. They set the bar for red apples standing out beautifully along the back of the border.

Roses

There were lots of roses looking great, too many for one blog, so I am just posting a few of my favourites.

Anemones

The anemones grow in a few patches around the garden but they really do come into their own this time of year. Masses of flowers over a good period. One of my favourites but they’ve not grown that well for me. My own white one in the front garden is still quite small and the back garden ones haven’t looked too healthy this year so I am keeping an eye on them.

Birds

The garden sees a good variety of birds visiting. I saw green, bull and goldfinches and multiple tit species while watching the feeders. But I did also spy this sparrowhawk eyeing up the buffet table.

Dahlias

I grew a mass of dahlias in 2019 and I gave a lot away. Two ended up in the in-laws and they are still thriving.

Alice

And last but by no means least, Alice had a good run around in the garden. They have a good bit of space to explore and the garden is divided with gates and fences and island beds, steps up to different levels. So there is lots to enjoy for a little child. She requested her usual photo on the hand chair.

And having a good run about on the lawn.

I’m back to work on Monday after the school holiday so hopefully get a few bits tidied up tomorrow. The garden is holding together alright but I’m preapring for moving a few bits around in the border as we go into autumn. Hope you all have good weekends and don’t forget to check the founder of six on Saturdays blog to see more posts.

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Flowers on Friday: Heuchera

Last week I started a series of plant profiles writing about Echinops. This week I thought I would talk about heuchera, partly because I just bought a new one, but partly because I do actually like their tiny little flowers. The vibrant red spikes of my coral forests are looking particularly nice at the moment. They are a useful plant providing evergreen structure over winter, suitable for pots or the border and filling shaded spots beautifully.

Heuchera are part of the Saxifragaceae family which puts them alongside saxifrages (obviously), Astilbes, Rodgersias, Heucherellas, Bergenias, Tiarellas and more in the same family. They are native to North America with most cultivars originating from Heuchera americana. Hybridization is common with around 37 species intermingling. They are distributed across a variety of habitats including mountains and beaches, but in general, they prefer part shade. They can be grown in full sun if they are provided with suitable moisture levels. Some varieties can cope better with the sun. Plantagoggo offers an extensive range and you can filter by conditions. They enjoy moist well-drained soil but can tolerate periods of drought. They will often look the worse for wear after hot weather but they are a tough plant capable of bouncing back with some care.

They are largely grown for ground cover and as foliage plants. The foliage comes in an amazing range of colours from lime greens through orange and reds and dark purples to almost black. They are a garden centre favourite for placing at the front of shops in autumn and winter where they will attract customers. The leaves remain evergreen through winter. Then in spring, they benefit from a spruce up. Pulling away dead leaves, clear the chaff and then a top dressing of compost around being careful not to bury the crown.

The flowers are very popular with bees. It came as a surprise to me how popular when I started growing them but the garden bumblebees love them. They flower for good periods too which is of great benefit to the bees. If you cut the flower stalks down they will often produce more.

While few people grow them for the flowers many are quite attractive, especially where they have a strong contrast to the leaves.

The wide leaves combine well with a lot of different plants within designs. They look good alongside other shade-loving plants like ferns and hostas. But equally, look good with the thinner forms of grasses. They can be grown in a variety of situations. I use them within the border where for much of the year they don’t stand out much. But come winter when much of the border shrivels away they carry on adding structure and colour through the darker months. I use them hidden amongst taller plants where they don’t show for much of the year but come into their own in winter. But I have also had good success growing them in containers as in the hanging basket above. Though, in containers, they are vulnerable to vine weevils.

They are vulnerable to a few pests and diseases with some varieties seeming to be more susceptible. Heuchera rust can be an issue in summer, particularly when warm and damp. This appears first as dimples on the leaves and can affect the look and vigour of the plant. When it strikes you cut the leaves off back to the crown, taking care not to cut the crown and remove them from your garden. Don’t compost them as this may put rust back into your soil in future. Leaves return pretty quickly. Heuchera rust will only affect heuchera so it rarely causes much of a drama. Vine weevil on the other hand love heuchera and can move onto other plants. Vine weevil are a beetle that eats the leaves. The bigger damage comes from the grubs that eat the roots. Often the first sign you get is when you lift part of a plant and the whole plant lifts off the ground. I have written previously about how I tackled them here. So far it seems to be working with the nematodes forming the main defence. My lighter green heuchera such as lime marmalade seem to have been more affected by both rust and vine weevil. It might be a coincidence but it does put off buying more of these cultivars unless cheap. This is a shame as they are some of my favourites as they contrast well against many other plants.

They can be propagated by several methods written about previously. The most common method being division. They spread well over a couple of years. They often get a bit too woody so division is good for refreshing the plant. I did have some success with rooting cuttings, but it was slow with a high failure rate. Divison and cuttings have the advantage that the plant will be a clone of the parent. So, if you want a particular colour you need to use these methods. They do also self-seed quite freely. However most offspring I have ended up with a return to a block colour. The attractive veining on many cultivars hasn’t been present in the offspring. I grew heuchera from seed last year. I tried a few varieties but I think greenfinch was the most successful. Initial germination was high. But many didn’t survive when potted on. Many people reported that they found the seedlings grow so far and halted growth. I found they benefitted from a regular liquid feed to get them past this point. It was worth growing from seed as even with the losses along the way I’ve probably still ended up with double figures of plants.

I hope that was useful to some of you. It’s useful for me to carry on writing them to secure my knowledge ready for RHS exams. It’s a plant I’ve made use of a lot. It’s a good time of year to look for purchasing them as the retailers stock more ready for autumn and winter interest.

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Six on Saturday: 21.8.21

I’ve had a good week of gardening. It’s been quite wet but I’ve still got on with a good few jobs. I’ve planted out quite a lot in the Forest School at work. It’s looking alright, but give it a few years and it should fill out well. I’m not sure how well each plant will do as it is pretty heavy shade. But I’ve got most of the plants cheap so it’s no great drama if there is some loss. I had a pleasant trip to Stillingfleet Lodge Gardens yesterday which I’m sure I’ll write about another day. Today is my third wedding anniversary. Amy almost forgot but my sister reminded her. We’re not doing anything special but it was a nice excuse to add some more sea hollies to the garden.

Facebook bargains

I’ve done well out of Facebook this week. I picked up a water butt and coldframe cheap for work. The waterbutt has been put in forest school. I just need to pick up a connector kit. I’m not sure whether the coldframe is going to work or at home. I might use if for winter to home the primulas and foxgloves and then move it to work. The wormery was free, including worms. These are great. They produce a small amount of high quality compost. But, more importantly the worm wee makes a great liquid fertiliser. It slowly drips out and then you dilute it in a watering can.

Stargazer lilies

These have grown to nice big blocks. A few have been nibbled by the dreaded beetles but enough have made it to flower. They work well with the hydrangea limelight behind. I took the advice a few years ago to grow them in shade to reduce the number of beetles and it does seem to work.

I know a lot of people don’t like them but I do. They are quite exotic in nature and bring something to the garden late summer before the gladioli and aster gets going.

And the hoverflies particularly like them.

Farfugium japonicum ‘wavy gravy’

After a lecture through Lou Nichols patreon gardening club by Phillip Oostenbrink on tropical gardening I saw this plant and wanted it. In the lecture he mentioned the spotty version. But I saw the wavy foliage at the garden centre. The local garden centre is stocking less and less in the way of variety of plants so I was surprised to see it. Accounts differ on hardiness so we’ll see how it does. It’s gone in the foliage mix of the front garden.

Butterflies

When it’s not been raining it has actually been quite pleasant and I’ve seen a few more butterflies out. There have been lots of whites a few peacocks and a good few small tortoiseshells about.

Plant bargains

I’ve been keeping my eye out for some more grpund cover plants for work, so stopped in at the road outside Wassand Hall. On the road up to the hall is a cottage with a plant stall outside. They usually have a mix of hardy geraniums and a few other bits but they had a good selection out this week. I picked up three candalabra primulas, a lovely coloured heuchera and a vibrant pink flowered salvia wishes and kisses. The salvia will need cuttings taking to get it through winter, but it was cheap enough to be worth taking a chance on. The primulas were one of the standout plants at Harlow Carr and I fancy a few clumps of these. They should then self seed and spread gradually.

Agapanthus

Agapanthus formed a key part of our wedding flowers and these were planted following the wedding. It’s taken three years for them to bulk out to a decent flowering point but they are looking great. I had planted a mix of blue and white but there is still no sign of the white. I don’t know whether they’ve died off or if it is the fault of Thompson & Morgan but too late to complain.

I’ve also added a new variety to mark our anniversary, Silver Moon. It is a varieagated variety. So even if takes several years to flower at least the foliage is bringing something to the garden.

I hope you all have nice weekends. I’ve got a good few plant purchases to find spaces for and a few more seeds I want to get started this weekend.

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Six on Saturday: Furzey Gardens

While down in Dorset we visited Furzey gardens. This is a lovely little garden nestled within the New Forest. It is an RHS partners garden so I probably could have got free entry but didn’t mind paying to support. The garden is a social enterprise providing work experience and training for people with learning disabilities. There is a cafe within the gardens. Currently, it was offering drinks and a few light bites. I don’t know if it is any different when Covid restrictions are fully over.

  1. The Cottage Garden

When you first enter the garden you are met with the cottage. This is surrounded by informal cottage garden style borders. Lots of herbaceous perennials. They do have a cottage you can let for occasions. I’m not sure if this one is available to let or if there is another one on site.

It rained on and off lightly while we were there so the bees were in and out during our visit. But, this border was very active.

These borders were stunning, filled with colour. Amy spent ages taking close up photos of many flowers. If I used her photos we would be getting on for 66 on a Saturday, probably more.

2. Woodland borders

As you’d expect from a garden in the New Forest much of the garden is wooded. There are a lot of camellias and rhododendrons, but these weren’t offering any colour at this time of year. There are little hidden paths and structures with viewing points over the area hidden away.

Hidden within the garden are 40 fairy doors. I think we found maybe 20. Alice enjoyed looking so kept her busy.

The woodland contains lots of ferns and some interesting foliage plants.

And a good few hydrangea happy in the shade.

3. The play area

The play area is made up of a large scale fairy village. Lots of huts and tunnels and walls to climb around.

Alice was a bit unsure of the ladders but once she’d been up a few times she loved it.

She had a good play before falling off the swing which put an end to her fun. But she recovered after a snack.

4. The meadow

Surrounding the play area there is an area of meadow with paths cut through.

This area was very species-rich with many hoverflies, bees, butterflies and beetles visible. Here we have a soldier beetle.

In this photo there is a small copper with the wings open and a gatekeeper.

Gatekeepers have been the most numerous butterfly we saw in Dorset.

5. The pond

On the walk down to the pond, there was bursts of rain. But, by the time we got down there it was stupendously hot. You can see how much the sun is shining off the water. I took a lot of overexposed photos along this section.

Grey wagtails were hopping back and forth on the lilypads.

Around the side, massive gunneras dominated an area. Alice refused to stand next to them for comparison.

And there were a few different butterflies. A brimstone.

And a speckled wood.

6. Birds

There was lots of birds around the garden. Many of the smaller ones were quite tame. The robins came onto the picnic tables while we had our lunch.They were very accommodating for photos.

I thoroughly enjoyed this garden. From the description we thought it would be a little drop off and then head into Lyndhurst but we spent a good few hours there. Alice loved the fairy trail and playpark. Amy was happy taking photos and I was happy enjoying the wildlife and plants. The plant sales were very reasonable priced and by souther standards were probably excellent. From little £2 pots of easy self seeders to some decent shrubs. If we lived closer I’d be using it regularly, but I wasn’t going to to fit anything in the car for the journey back. But I did get some primula seeds so I can hopefully grow a memento of the garden. I am working on my next plant profiles for my current RHS assignment so I’ll probably research these one. Hope you all enjoy your weekends, we have a busy one ahead but then I have two days with Alice booked in for ballet school, so have a bit of time to ourselves.

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Six on Saturday: 7.8.21

This is a prerecorded episode of six on Saturday. We will be on our way back from a week in Dorset today. So, this week’s six was written just before we left last week. Hopefully the garden will still be looking good with the flowers that are on the verge of opening still on show. Rain was forecast so hopefully it won’t be too dry.

  1. Digitalis lutea

I grew this perennial variety of foxglove last year from seed. They are now flowering. They are much shorter than the more common purpurea. Measuring between 30cm and 50cm with small white flowers. They don’t seem to be popular with any of the wildlife in the way the Digitalis purpurea is but they have the advantage of being short lived perennials rather than biennial so I don’t have to keep regrowing them every single year.

2. Lythrum salicaria ‘Robin’

This perennial has been shifted around the border multiple times. I’ve not quite found a space it fits with the plants around it. It forms woody spires with little pink tubular flowers. It is meant to be a bog plant or marginal plant for a pond but it seems to have been happy enough in our clay soil. It would probably look better if I had a few more patches of it along the border. It is getting towards division point this year so I think I’ll try splitting it and spreading it along the border for repetition.

The smaller bees love it, so while it isn’t the most amazing looking plant it is serving a purpose within our wildlife gardening efforts.

3. Calendula ‘snow princess’

This is a self seeded calendula that I think is probably the offspring of snow princess. It is very pale, almost white. It has found its way into the shade of the hydrangeas and Acer. The paleness means it stands out quite well in the shade.

4. Iris foetidissma ‘Paul’s Gold’

Iris foetidissma is one of our two native irises. It is usually used as a shade plant. once established it is usually a survivor. The flowers are small and lillac. Pretty but not that eye grabbing in the way most irises are. It is more commonly grown for the leaves and seeds. These are evergreen and provide spikes through winter. The seeds stay attached to the plant through winter providing colour. They are usually red or orange though a white variety ‘fructo alba’ has been cultivated. Paul’s gold has been bred for the yellow strap leaves. It is essentially the same as aurea which has the smae yellow leaves. The leaves stand out in a semi-shaded spot. I don’t actually like it as much as the wild form but I’m becoming interested in the possibilities of hybridization so it’s good to have a few cultivars.

5. Hydrangea paniculata ‘little lime’

This is a smaller version of the popular limelight. I have grown it in a pot where it is thriving. As you can see, it’s covered in flowers. The majority of the cone is sterile but the ends contain nectar for the insects. It is usually popular with the butterflies but it has been too wet for them the last few day.

And a close up of a cone.

6. Dahlia, possibly Addison June

I think this is probably Addison June but as normal lables have been removed by either Alice or the birds. Amy and Alice chose this one back in April sales. It is a striking one, though I usually avoid the ruffles as they are less use for pollinators. But it was their choice so there you go. It’s the first of this years dahlias to flower. I haven’t grown many this year as so many returned last year. But, it’s looking like the slugs have eaten most in the border. But the three I’ve got should bring plenty of colour. I got fed up dead heading last year so at least I won’t have as much to do.

Hope you’ve enjoyed this week’s six. Hopefully we have managed some garden visits on our trip down south that I can feature next week.

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Six on Saturday: 24.7.21

It is now the school holiday. It’s been a lovely year at the nursery and I’ve been lucky to work with lots of groups of amazing kids. We’ve got lots of gardening plans for next year at work so will be nice to get cracking on that.

Discount climbers

Tesco’s has obviously been worried about the heatwave as they reduced all plants by 25%. I picked up a pile of climbers for my work project and some for me. Honeysuckle and passionflowers for the shaded woodland border. Then a clematis for my garden.

Geranium rozanne

I know this is a very popular geranium as it is reliable but I’m not really that bothered by it. The colours are not that exciting. Most of the hardy geraniums have been given a hard prune to the ground. They’ll grow and flower several times a year treated this way. Rozanne is still flowering well though. The bees like it at least.

Love in a mist

A house around the corner was selling pots for 50p. 50p well spent. I love the strange flowers and the seed pods that follow.

Echinops ritro

Butterflies have made the news the last few weeks. The wet spring and start to summer has meant numbers are down. So I’m trying to make sure they have some decent flowers available when they are in flight. This is a short globe thistle that should be good for bees and butterflies. They like a sunny position with free-draining soil. Mine is improved clay but this should mean it is fairly drought tolerant and shouldn’t need much watering. Possibly none once established.

Eryngium planum

Sea holly was part of our wedding flowers and I’ve got a few patches around. I’ve added this one as it’s a nice tall one to add some height mid borders. As with the globe thistles, they are good for wildlife and drought tolerant. Mine have returned each year but not seed seeded. I think with my clay soil they don’t self seed as readily as other soils. But we’ll see if this year is any different.

Small tortoiseshell

I have started to see a few more butterflies but we have rain forecast for the next week which badly affects butterflies’ ability to fly. So it’s going to be more important than ever to provide for the butterflies during the periods they can fly. Here is one on the hydrangea.

Today we have Alice’s ballet lesson before a break for summer, followed by a kids party. I’m going to be carrying on with clearing a bit more of the forest school this week for the woodland border. Then begin planning the allotment and sensory garden areas. Hope you all enjoy the weekend.

Six on Saturday: 36.6.21 RHS Harlow Carr

Last Monday I had my next round of RHS exams. I think the soil module went well. I may have managed a commendation, not so sure about plant health. I think I passed but not sure of what level. But I had less interest in learning about chemical controls I have no intention of using. On the way to my exam, I stopped off for a quick visit to RHS Harlow Carr. It’s the first time I’ve visited. I want to try and make use of my student RHS membership while I get it cheap. Sadly most of the gardens are open for RHS members on workdays so I rarely get to take advantage. The weather was good, cloudy but warm. Nice for walking around a garden. Not ideal for photos but I got some wildlife shots I’m quite proud of. My six are going to go beyond six photos into six categories because there were far more than six things to enjoy.

Wildlife

The gardens are providing for a rich and diverse variety of wildlife. I saw a good number of birds species, bees and butterflies. The combinations of stream, woodland, meadows and wildlife friendly plants provides a good range of habitats for wildlife. My wife is teaching more photography next year and I’ve been taking some pointers and it’s paying off.

A small tortoiseshell in the scent garden.

A blue tit near the bird hide. There were a lot of bird feeders around though most were empty. I think they are still probably getting by on lower staff numbers with Covid. The bird hide feeders were stocked and swamped by squirrels with a few birds venturing on.

A crow and ferns. I like corvids. They are beautiful birds in their satorical eleagance. Combined with ferns for a nice background.

Squirells were hovering up food all other the place.

Irises

I love an iris and right now there many at their best. Harlow Carr had a great numbe of beauties.

Iris robusta gerald darby

Iris chysographes. A stunning dark beauty.

The alpine house

I’ve never been that interested in alpines and rockeries. I grow a few but as I have put much my effort into my shaded front garden with thick clay they don’t have much place there. But it was interesting to see and alpine house. None of the local gardens we visit regularly have one so it made a change.

It was interesting seeing how some are planted in a roughly natural setup spreading through the rocks while others are contained in their pot.

And an orchid.

Meadows

A lot of the outer areas had been left to go to meadow which was being visited by a few different insects even on a fairly grey day.

One of our native orchids.

The stream

The stream runs down the middle of the garden and had some of the most concentrated planting. This was very much to my taste. Lots of lush foliage with punctuations of flowers. The visitor boards explained how they are climate proofing the gardens by planting suitable plants and making use of the water and drainage.

The primula candelabra are what I will probably remember the garden for. These had been used in big blocks along a lot of the border. At the end of my visit I intended to buy some but I didn’t see any for sale. But it’s probably for the best as they worked so well here as they had been planted in large blocks, not just one or two.

The meconopsis were also looking grand, but I know their reputation for being awkward to grow to even consider spending the time on.

The inevitable purchases

Obviously, it was unavoidable that some plants would come home with me. The plants were largely at the silly price you would expect from an RHS garden. In some cases 3 times what I think I’d pay locally but there was some perennials at a reasonable price. I went with two salvias. Hot lips which I know many people dislike as there are now better lips on the market. But it is popular with bees and nice spilling out at the edge of a border. If they had amethyst lips I would probably have gone for that, but not available. I also went with one I know nothing about Salvia greggi mirage cherry red that looks to be a good vibrant red. This looks be a nice in your face colour. Then as the irises had been one of the stand out plants I went with iris Benton deirdre. This was a Cedric Morris bred iris with white petals with maroon feathery edging. It looks to be quite dramatic. The last purchase was a cheaper one on the way home from a toilet stop-off. I got a primula vialli. This was instead of the candelabras I had seen at Harlow Carr. This will fit better amongst my existing plants though I could probably do with another pot or two. But it will gradually spread.

I hope you have enjoyed my Harlow Carr visit and I make no apologies for featuring more than six photos. There are still lots more I could show off.

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The peoples walk for wildlife: what difference does it make?

So, what difference does it make?
So, what difference does it make?
It makes none
But now you have gone
And you must be looking very old tonight

The Smiths

Today is the peoples walk for wildlife. Organised by Chris Packham, people have descended on Hyde Park to show support for wildlife. An admirable way to spend a wet Saturday. The event is promoting the manifesto for wildlife. This outlines a number of steps that could be taken to support our rapidly declining wildlife. Now, sadly, I’ve seen a lit of people on social media asking “what’s the point?” “What difference will it make?” Seeing as the movement has borrowed heavily from the punk movement it seems worth recalling a key punk legend.

On June 4th 1976, a little band, The Sex Pistols played a gig at Manchester’s Lesser Free Trade Hall. The gig has become legendary in music circles. Hundreds of people claim to have attended, though the hall probably only held 150 people at most. In reality, about 30 to 40 people probably attended.

So why the fuss? Well, from that small number attending many influential bands were formed. From this gig, we got the Buzzcocks and later magazine, The Smiths, Joy Division, The Fall and in some accounts Mick Hucknall of Simply Red (though maybe that last one wasn’t such a positive development). These bands put Manchester on the music map and have had an impact on modern music that can’t be calculated.

More info on the gig.

So what does this have to do with a wildlife demonstration? Well if a handful of people can attend a gig and go onto become world famous and sell millions of records around the world, what’s to say today’s attendees won’t go off to spread the message further. Many young people are attending with parents. Maybe we are looking at future conservationists, scientists, educators, politicians and who knows what else. One day can send out ripples for years to come.

Badger small
One of the animals in need of protection.

Now, I’m unable to make it, but I hope the people who are there enjoy themselves and send a clear message to our politicians and policymakers that we want wildlife on the agenda. But I’ve still been doing my little bit for wildlife today. Here are a couple of quick ways to help wildlife.

IMAG0047

We got out for a walk to the mere to see our local wildlife today

So to the people who attended, well done for supporting, and to the people who can’t like myself I hope you find some way this weekend to enjoy wildlife.

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Dorset holiday part 4

Our next trip out on our Dorset adventure took us to the New Forest Wildlife Park. While I do favour seeing animals in their natural environments some I would never get the chance to see. The New Forest Wildlife Park has many animals that are rescue animals that have required a home to survive. While the ethics of keeping animals in this way is hotly debated as more and more animals become endangered captive animals may offer opportunities for reintroducing species back to the wild.

We were greeted by a bear.

The park holds a number of species of owl and these were some of the first animals we saw. Alice was still riding high on the coattails of seeing the Gruffalo characters the day before and was excited to see the owls again. As mentioned before I have a fondness for owls.

Having recently read Simon Cooper’s excellent book, “the otters’ tale” I was excited to see the otters at the park. The park has several species: the Asian short-clawed otter, giant otters and the North American Otters. Our native otter Lutra lutra was absent. But I enjoyed seeing the otters on offer bounding around. Truly amazing animals. Slick through the water and bounding playfully on land.

Alice was quick to spot them.

Inside we found the rather cute harvest mice and hedgehogs. I’m glad to say Alice correctly identified both.

The park feeds the birds in the forest. Blue tits and great tits were enjoying the feeders.

Underneath the feeders a taste of the wild, Rattus Norvegicus, the brown rat. While generally not a welcome visitor it was good to see this animal moving around the forest floor.

The lynx was very accomadating for photos.

Alice stopped for a brief break with Amy.

Wallabies roam the enclosure with you.

Alice was keen to spot the wolves with her binoculars, but no luck.

Another wild invader of the park.

Alice enjoyed digging in the play area.

The bees are starting to come out in greater numbers a sure sign Spring is here.

We didn’t make it round all the animals. There were more deer and bison across the other side of the park, but we didn’t think Alice’s legs would take any more.

Before heading back to the house we stopped off at IKEA for a few things for Alice’s room. It was just a short journey on from the park. While it was hell on Earth for me Alice seemed to think it was just a giant soft play area.

Once back at the house a tired Alice tucked herself into the blanket.

One last day to discuss of the holiday and then that’s the lot.

Edging the lawn

Today saw me braving the cold to make a start on my plans to edge the lawn. Our next door neighbours have knocked out a chimney breast and we claimed lots of vintage Edwardian red bricks for my garden. They were heading for the skip, but were upcycling them. The bricks are getting dug into the lawn edge to hopefully give me a neater edge when mowing.

I’ve previously edged the bench area with stone bricks, so it won’t all match. But I don’t want to see these lovely bricks go to waste.

Alice watched on.

Before enjoying her Christmas present.

Then abandoning me to play on her push along.

The blackbirds have been watching me from next door but one while enjoying the apples left on the trees. Hornsea is full of fruit trees where the fruit are never harvested giving the birds a good Winter food source.

I’ve got through half today and hopefully finish the job later in the week.

The garden is looking set for Spring. The daffodils are coming up strong now. Soon be flowering. I’m seeing a few tulips peeking through. I’ve even got one allium making an early break for it.