Six on Saturday: 20.10.18 the second coming

At the moment the garden has a feel of winding down at this point of the year. But over the last week I’ve had a flush of repeat flowers on a number of plants. Most not as impressive as the first, but still a welcome colour revival.

1. Yellow Rose

The yellow rose seems to suddenly take off at this point of the year putting on massive growth with a handful of blooms. I’ve cut it back hard each year so the growth comes from within other shrubs. I think if I ever left it this would become a beast. As it stands it gives a good display. It came with the garden when I moved in. I probably wouldn’t have selected a yellow rose, but it does fade pleasantly through from the fiery yellow to a buttery yellow.

2. Pink Rose

The pink rose has suffered from many rose chompers this year. I think the hot dry summer gave ideal conditions for several insects. The leaves look terrible and a lot of the petals are brown edged, but there are some good looking blooms coming through.

3. Marigolds

My mum planted these in the first summer I moved in. They now periodically pop in random spots along the border. Not the most exciting flowers, but the pollinators are enjoying a spread of flowering season.

4. Ox eye daisies

The ox-eye daisies are putting on another burst of flowering after I hacked them back. Not as good as the first round, but given a good late season source of pollen for many insects.

5. Fuchsia-shrimp cocktail

The fuchsia I’m sure was labelled shrimp cocktail, but I think it was mislabelled as it looks nothing like any variety I can find. Another gift from my mum when I moved in. It grows quite small. The flowers are nothing very exciting. Its redeeming feature is that it is still alive when other fuchsias died. It is a bright colour burst as things get darker.

6. Borage

The borage was cut back and self-seeded patches have grown up as well. Borage is recommended for bees. This and the ivy flowers will keep a number of bees species happy in my garden before they disappear for the year.

I can see signs that a few of the Autumn flowering plants are looking set to bloom, so hopefully have some more colour still to come this year. Though the more I garden the more attached to Chritopher Lloyd’s foliage ideas I become.

“It is an indisputable fact that appreciation of foliage comes at a late stage in our development” Christopher Lloyd foliage plants

Though I don’t think I’m quite willing to do a Christo and rip out the roses yet. Enjoy your weekends and check out the other #sixonsaturday through twitter.

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Six on Saturday-14.7.18

A the garden is seeing a lot of the taller plants coming into flower. The lawn is holding on. The shaded parts still looking lush, while the centre is looking dryer and dryer.

1. Fennel

The fennel is growing good and strong currently. I grow it for the umbel flowers that are good for butterflies. I’ve got a few smaller plants to put in the border. The feathery foliage makes a good contrast to the dark leaves of the camellia and hollyhocks around it.

2. Unknown perennial

Bought for me last year. It lacked a label. It has been on the verge of flowering for weeks and is now putting on a good show.

3. Fuchsia

The first of the fuchsias is now flowering well. I took this one out of the border as it was getting swamped and put it into a pot. The contrasting white and pink flowers are quite attractive. Quite a few of the fuchsias didn’t survive the harsh winter, so happy this is a survivor.

4. Teasel

The teasel has featured earlier in the year. It has grown up above the fence and has an abundance of flowers growing tall attracting in the insects. While quite spectacular it has quite a large footprint in the border taking up a good metre square at the base. The leaves and stems have vicious spikes making it an unpleasant job tying up. Not sure if I’ll let it grow again. I’ll have to see if it brings in the birds later in the year.

5. Chives

My mum divided some of her chives. They were ripped apart by seagulls trampling them, but one has hung onto flower.

6. Rose Scarlet Paul’s climber

I planted two of these Tesco £2 plants to replace another climbing rose that was doing all its flowering above the fence and on the neighbours side. I’m going to try to train these so I get better flowering across the fence. The first flower has opened up. While this year I’ll only have a few flowers they are looking to be quite glorious. Proper Scarlett Harlots providing bright blooms on the fence. There are two clematis next to it that are going strong. They should intertwine well.

Initially opening as a dark bloom.

Still keeping a rich colour as it fades.

And that’s my six. Hope you enjoyed. I’ve got lots of dead heading to get on with and some of the ox eye daises and forget me nots are past their best. Time to trim and pull.

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Six on a Saturday: 22.6.18

After several weeks of seeing everyone else’s roses flowering, the roses have finally flowered up North. The weekend is set to be a scorcher so going to be doing some watering. For the participants guide to six on a Saturday look here. Check the tag on twitter for a peak into lots of lovely gardens and veg plots.

1. Cottage maid

This was an new addition this year. This is a single flowering rose with a raspberry ripple effect on the petals. After a few days the ripple is fading leaving it looking like a pale pink, almost white flower. The smell was commented on the label as strong, but I can’t say I’ve noticed much, but my nose is blocked a bit currently.

It’s an old rose potentially growing to a good height, but I will probably keep it down. It will only do the one burst of flowers, so something to appreciate while it’s there. Looks like it’s going to give a reasonable display for it’s first year.

2. Yellow rose

The first year I took over the garden this was a poor performer. Last year after some feed it was a bit better. It grows out of another shrub, growing nice straight spires out if the foliage. After two Summers of lack lustre performances I was considering removing it. Almost everything else around us red, pink or shades of blue. It is just about the only yellow. But after giving it a good chop last year it’s come back stronger with lots of lovely large blooms.

The buds start as tight little flames.

Then opening to a bright sunshine yellow.

Before moving onto a rich, buttery creamy yellow.

3. Lychnis coronaria-rose campion

Rose campion is one of my favourites. It gives lots of little vibrant pink flowers. The hoverflies love it. It gives a good period of flowering. The hairy silver leaves makes it disagreeable to slugs and snails. They also provide a contrast to many of the surrounding plants. It has started to self seed with several small seedlings coming up from last years seed offerings.

4. Honeysuckle

Along the fence in the shady corner honeysuckle grows up the fence. It has been thriving there. It grows up and through the lilac. It smells beautiful, although I’m probably the only person who smells it when weeding underneath it. When sat on the bench you can get a good whiff of it. The first flowers are now opening.

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5. Plant supports

These plant supports were selling off at £3. I didn’t have anything particularly in mind, beyond maybe the new roses, but they had a massive reduction on them and I like a bargain.

6. The view from above

The garden is looking good, almost up to the zenith of Summer flowering. Alice’s bedroom has the view of it. The ox eye daisies are looking good on mass from above. Up close there a mass of stems trying to spill in every direction. My staking efforts straining against the mass. But it has given me plenty of cut flowers for the house. The hydrangeas are starting to bloom and the hollyhocks are almost set to flower. Alice gets the best view of it all from above.

Hope you all enjoy your weekends.

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Summer Garden Round Up

We have come to the end of the Summer holidays. It’s time to go back to work, so before I do it’s time to sit back and admire the progress made in the garden this Summer.

Patio

On the patio the pots are doing quite well. I moved one of the fuchsias from the border into a barrel planter as it was getting lost in the border. It seems to be doing well for the change. The night scented stock is doing well bringing in some night time insects.

I put my new mitre saw to use making a corner of decking to cover where the cement ground is uneven. At the back is a dwarf cherry tree that was totally dehydrated at the start of the holiday, but re-potted,  some gravel on the top to keep in moisture and plenty of water over Summer has brought it back.

The poached egg plants are flowering well now.

Our newly refurbished table looks nice on the patio giving us a small table for a cuppa.

My parents have passed on another bigger table. This corner of the patio previously had planters built into the walls. However they’d been built without proper drainage. So the worry was that they were damaging the house. I’ve knocked them out this Summer giving us a much bigger space to eventually build our log store and seating area.

Borders

The rose campion has done well flowering throughout the Summer. Reading Margery Fish she wrote that it should self seed a small number of new plants. So hopefully we will still have a patch next year. I’m keeping some seed heads to try to grow some if it doesn’t self seed.

The alyssum is on its second flowering. Now an area is established like my forget me nots it should self seed around the borders.

The sedum is set for flowering giving the pollinators an Autumn food source.

There are still some daisies left to flower.

The pot marigolds are still going strong.

Planting for bees

The foxgloves, hollyhock and borage are still hanging on in there providing for the bees. I don’t think the hollyhock and foxgloves have much more flowering time left in them, but now they’ve established I should have more growing next year.

Shed shade

Next to the newly painted shed is a corner with plenty of shade. I have a variety of ferns doing pretty well. They’ll give me some year round greenery and they suppress the weeds in an awkward to get to corner. Having watched the fern-atic on gardeners world this week I was inspired to add some more. I’ve got two more British varieties to go in.

Roses

I trimmed back the roses in Spring quite severely and they’ve done better this year. I’ve had flowers from the pink rose through all of Summer and still flowers coming.

They do some from fungal infections though. I’m trying some advice from the Beechgrove Garden to spray with water and a few drops of tree oil. This works on fungus and helps protect the leaves. Just don’t do when it’s too sunny or the oil may burn the leaves.

Composting

The compost heap had been filled with rubbish while the house was rented. I’ve removed what was there and put in two bins donated from my dad. The slabs have been upcycled from the patio planter I removed so nothing goes to waste. While the bins aren’t as effective as an open heap they will still give me some compost to put some goodness back in the borders.

I hope you’ve enjoyed this peak into my garden progress.

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Garden update

Having updated on the school garden yesterday I thought I’d update on my own garden as a few flowers have come into bloom. Last year entering the 30 days of wild we were living in our previous house. The garden was nice, but we were surrounded by paved over gardens and little wildlife of any sort came in. The new house is surrounded by other gardens containing trees and flowers bringing a greater biodiversity. The big garden birdwatch saw double figures of species. The newly relaunched Great British Bee Hunt is seeing a greater variety of bees in my garden. I’ve made good steps towards making the garden welcoming to wildlife.

In the last few days the first cornflower has bloomed.

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I have the fist daisy flowering in the border amongst the forget me nots. I believe it’s camomile, although I do have oxeye daisies as well. I’ve already seen a few butterflies coming down to settle on it. Just one flowering daisy already making the difference.

The foxgloves are set to flower. I love foxgloves, so I’m keen to get them established and then hopefully they’ll reseed. Great for the bees and very pretty at he back of the border. Mine have been chewed a lot, but I’ve tried to remain spray free to encourage all life.

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The lavender has come back strong. I cut it back a lot at he end of Autumn as advised and it’s flowering well this year.

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My alliums are looking good. I’ve seen quite a bit of alliums over the last week on the Chelsea Flower Show coverage. There clearly a bit of a trend at the moment. Mine I believe are Turkish onion.

The first of the roses to flower has done so spectacularly. It was a bit limp last year, but after a harsh pruning it has come back surrounding the butterfly house beautifully.

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So this year I’ll be starting the 30 days wild with my own little wildlife space looking much stronger than last year. Only a few days to go until the big month. I managed one wild act every day last year. I’ll have to see if I do as well this year.

Mandela Gardens

On Wednesday I spent an afternoon at Hull Heritage Learning finding out more about their proposed Hull Curriculum. They have put together a set of resources on 20 Hull histories ready for Hulls year as the city of culture. Some wonderfully enthusiastic people leading the way.

The day was hosted in the cities museum quarter with a marque set up in the Mandela gardens. While only a small walled garden they are looking beautiful at this time of year. For those who haven’t ever been it’s a lovely secluded area in the old historic part of the city. You have the museum for William Wilberforce (top rate slave abolisher), the street-life museum (many old vehicles for the young uns to rampage on) and the history museum (giant woolly mammoth and super Roman Mosaics). Best of all it’s all free and I think we have a better collection than the York museum which charges a small fortune for a family day out.

We still have one of the Phillip Larkin toads on display.

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A lovely collection of roses.

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The pond is full of mighty beasts in the depths.

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Gandhi adds an element of calm to the garden.

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Two of the residents at the museum.

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A few of the vehicles on offer in the streetlife museum.

Some more pollen beetles.

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On the way home I tracked down another moth for Amy.

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