30 days wild: day 18-dawn chorus and planting for wildlife

Today was an early start with Alice waking at half 3 and not going back down. So I heard the dawn chorus. Now the dawn chorus is normally regarded one of natures wonders. But today it was more a cacophony of chaos. Living by the sea the seagulls started as the opening act followed by jackdaws and pigeons.

It wasn’t for an hour or so until I started to hear more melodic tunes from the songbirds. But I did get through the gardeners world 50th anniversary. I’m glad Monty presents now and not Titsmarsh. He’s not my cup of tea. Then managed a few Springwatch unsprung episodes.

I worked on school work through the morning, then got out in the garden late afternoon. It was too hot earlier, but by the time I got out it had cooled off. I did some weeding. Cleared a bit of space around a fuscia and Hebe that were being drowned out by camomile. I’ve reported a few plants on the patio and had a general tidy. Then added a few more pots for wildlife with poached egg plant and night scented stock. Less inviting for wildlife I set up a planter with alpines Amy likes. Alice had her paddling pool out, but wasn’t bothered about going in. But feeling how cold it was I don’t blame her. She did have a dig in the earth though and pretended to water the plants with her watering can.

We both ticked off the wild act of feeling the grass between our toes. It was too hot for shoes and socks most of the day.

The insect life was spectacular today. With the sun out bees and dragonflies were out in abundance. I still don’t seem to have much that appeals to butterflies. So need to work on that.

 

30 days wild: day 15-cloud watching

Day 15 brings us to half way through 30 days wild. It’s going fast. I started early with a bowl of Jordan’s granola outside on the patio. Jordans, as well as making tasty granola, also support the wildlife trust. They put aside part of their land for wildlife. While enjoying my breakfast I listened to the birdsong. I’ve been trying to improve my recognition by sound. I recognised the blackbirds, sparrows, pigeons and seagulls. There was one I don’t know, but I think it might of been some form of tits. I also engaged in the wild act of cloud gazing. The moon was still visible. The previous act of finding something blue would have been easy today. The clouds today were the nice big fluffy white variety of Andy’s wallpaper in toy story.

 

 

I had lain out a tarp to dry ready for den day tomorrow and found some spectacular wildlife underneath when I moved it. It’s amazing what will settle in dark, warm spots in gardens.

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I tried unsuccessfully to capture a photo of the housemartins but only got a seagull.

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In work I started getting things ready for tomorrow’s den day. We have wigwams inside. Then outside we have tarps, parachutes, curtains, pegs, tape, and the portable dividers to use to make our dens. It’s my first stay and play with parents at my new school, so hopefully be fun.

 

 

Outdoor classroom-music area and hedgehogs

One of my TAs husbands generously spent part of his weekend making a new music area for our F2 playground. With pallets from his work, a selection of kitchen pans and a dismatled xylophone we have a new music area. This adds to the provision we don’t need to bring in and out each day making our job easier. The day has been wet, but still a good number of kids investigating. I’m grateful to have a team of staff keen to move things on and keep improving provision.

I’ve also been working out what wildlife we see in our setting. I left the trail camera for the weekend to discover a hedgehog crossing the playground. I expected urban foxes, not hedgehogs. The children were delighted to see the video.

https://youtu.be/7KllJux-d8s

At the weekend added another bee to the list I can identify. Last year taking part in the Great British bee hunt I came to know white tailed bumblebees and honey bees well as they were the few visitors to my old garden. New garden though has seen common carder bee. Its strange how joy can be gained from simply identifying a bee, but it does make me happy learning more about these wonderful creatures.

All human knowledge is precious whether it serves the slightest human use.
A.E. Houseman


Start a wildflower meadow

Continuing my RSPB home for nature plan I have set aside an area in the front garden for a wildflower meadow. Wildflowers creates a feast for bees, butterflies and other insects. From that it gives the birds another supply of food. There also very attractive looking.

RSPB link

The patch chosen is a little strip alongside the front path. It had nothing growing of any major use. A couple of dandelions, but no great variety for attracting insect life.

I started by turning over the soil and taking out the couple of dandelions.

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I broke up the soil to make it finer. Wildflower mix will generally find a way to grow, but might as well make it easier to take.

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I added a thin layer of compost from the heap to give the soil a layer of fresh nutrients. The soil in my garden is mainly clay, so the compost will hopefully help the flowers a little further.

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Then scattered a box of wildflower mix, a bag of seeds from the friends of the earth bee pack then a few poppy seeds and other seed packs.

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Lastly walked over to step it in and watered.

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I was concerned that it was too late in the year but watching a gardeners world episode it encouraged setting up an area pretty much any time except late Autumn and early Winter, so we’ll see what happens.

Currently we have not moved into the house so took across one bird feeder from the current house to see what comes in. So far just pigeons, but at this point of the year most birds will find their own food while insects are plentiful. We are by the sea, so slightly concerned that the seagulls will scare away some of my favourite garden birds, but will have to wait and see.

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I’ve potted some lavender. I like lavender as an insect attracting flower and cat repentant (don’t want the birds eaten), but it does badly in clay soil, so I’ll see if it can manage in pots.

I’ve added a insect home and butterfly home ticking off another home for nature activity.

Build a bee B&B

The garden is currently pretty wild, which I’m in favour of, but mainly just for slugs and snails. So I’ve worked on clearing the dandelion forest to claim a flower bed back. A good afternoons work digging and turning over.

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I’ve got some ivy ready to continue adding to the  on the fence. Very important for many moth species, spiders and giving some further cover.

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And a butterfly enjoying the garden.

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The petition is gradually growing.  Please continue to share and support.

https://petition.parliament.uk/petitions/161489

https://www.facebook.com/UKclimatematters/

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The bee cause

It was good to see some positive news from Friends of the Earth after helping support the bee cause throughout the great British Bee Hunt. A bee also provided one of my favourite photos during 30 days of wild.

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From Friends of the Earth:

Dear Joshua

I can’t wait to tell you this: yesterday, following advice from its own pesticide experts, the Government rejected another application to use banned bee-harming pesticides. This is a huge win for our bees.
 
But while our bees can breathe a sigh of relief now, I’m really concerned about what Brexit means for bees and nature in general. 
 
Join the campaign to protect nature – including bees.

The National Farmers’ Union (which already had a similar request to use neonicotinoid pesticides turned down this year) won’t be too happy about this. Nor the two giant pesticide companies who supported the proposal (no prizes for guessing why).
 
Thanks to your support we were able to pull together a stack of evidence to oppose the application and show that bee-friendly methods of farming without neonics are available.

The use of neonics is currently restricted at a European level, but that could all change outside the EU. And that would be catastrophic for bees.
 
Can you help make sure bees are protected from neonics for good?
 
More and more scientific evidence is showing the threat to bee species and other pollinators like butterflies from neonics. As we figure out what Brexit really means for the UK, one thing we can’t do is let the Government lift the ban on neonics – there’s just no reason to do it.
 
Just this week we heard more great news that Dorset County Council will ban neonics from council-owned land. Another win for bees – and evidence of a growing determination that neonics mustn’t be allowed to threaten our green and pleasant land.
 
Together we can create a future that’s better for our bees.
 
Emi & the bees team

On a separate note the hunt for giant Moths has taken off around Hull to celebrate Amy Johnson.

My first find near my school.

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Trying out apps

Spent the last few days playing around with the pl@nt net app. The plant net app works by you taking a photo then it compares with its database to see what matches. It then brings up a list of what organ you have photographed: leaf, flower, fruit, bark, other. So far just tried flowers and leaves. It seems more confident on flowers than leaves. The app was developed in France and designed with wildlfowers in mind rather than ornamental flowers from the product description. Although so far I’ve found it better with garden flowers than wild flowers.

After playing around for a few days it currently doesn’t seem that great at identifying unless you already have a vague idea of what it is already. However the app is reliant on contributions from users. So in theory it should get better as it is used more, so I will persist to see if it improves over time.

Here are a few of my submissions.

It knew the rose campion.

It identified the fuchsia, but it gave quite a few suggestions before the fuchsia came up. I thought this would be an easy one with the distinctive shape and contrasting shades of pink and purple, but it wasn’t the first suggestion.

It wasn’t sure of this, but neither am I.

The poppy it identified as the first result.

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The woodland trust have created a tree id app which I would like to try. However it is only currently available for apple devices. It is due out for android later in the Summer.

One of my favourite apps from the last month is sadly defunct. The Great British Bee app is now inactive. I did however manage what I reckon has been my most detailed bee photo yet.

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