Bay Badger

The last few days we’ve been visiting my in laws to be at Robin Hoods Bay. On the journey there we got stuck in Scarborough with the rain. Over a couple of minutes the weather changed from a dry day to the roads becoming rivers up to car doors. We found ourselves stuck in the middle of a crossroad of streets closed off. So we took shelter in a pub for lunch while it eased off and drained a bit. On the way out of Scarborough we passed a few cars still submerged, but we made it through unscathed. A little scary at times. So we arrived at the bay a little later than intended.

Amy’s dad had asked about trying the trail cam in their garden. They knew they had badgers visiting at night, but wanted to see where they have been going. We captured a quick burst of the badger coming in and checking the camera and then disappearing on its way.

Amy’s dad thinks the badger comes in from one side of the garden and goes across, so I’ve left the trail camera with him to try a few more locations. I found some badger poo and dead rodents down on the cliff edge and a trail into the undergrowth that suggests a home, so we’ll see if he finds out more.

The view from the bay.

I’ll be writing up some more of our bay escapades over the next few days as far too much for one blog.

Folklore Thursday

In Japanese folklore badgers often shapeshift into promiscuous women.

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Stop the culls

https://petition.parliament.uk/petitions/165672

 

The news came yesterday that the government plans to continue and extend the badger culls into new counties. They have already taken place in Somerset and Gloucestershire since 2013 and in Dorset last year. The aim of the culls is to tackle bovine TB. Bovine TB is a serious issue for cattle farmers it affects thousands of farms and tens of thousands of cattle are culled each year as a result of it. There is a push to develop and approve vaccines for Bovine TB to vaccinate badgers and the cattle. However due to the expense and time this will take the culling option has been put forward as the main way of tackling the problem.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-37220043

So the culls have been going ahead which so far has been a very costly procedure.

A quick look at the figures:

2015 round of badger culling

Licensed culls in West Somerset, West Gloucestershire and Dorset

1,467

badgers culled in 2015

£1,779,000

total “badger control costs” for the year

  • £1,212.68 equivalent per badger culled
  • 743 badgers culled by “controlled shooting”
  • 724 badgers culled by cage trapping