Long tailed tit bumbarrels

I didn’t contribute any folklore Thursday posts on twitter, but did find this little literary reference I liked.

Up flies the bouncing woodcock from the brig
Where a black quagmire quakes beneath the tread
The fieldfare chatter in the whistling thorn
And for the awe round fields and closen rove
And coy bumbarrels twenty in a drove
Flit down the hedgerows in the frozen plain
And hang on little twigs and start again

John Clare
The “bumbarrels” is a colloquial for long tailed tits. As a name it rather suits them. The last few weeks I’ve had these coming in the garden a lot and are becoming more comfortably in my presence. 

I’m gradually getting closer for photos of these bumbarrels.

30 days wild: day 3-cook in the sunshine

This morning wasn’t massively wild. We went to nursery for a craft fair. We won some cereal bars (not the most exciting prize) on the tombola and bought some nice wildlife cards.

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Then had a tea and scone at one of the local churches coffee mornings. They had a band playing and it was rather jolly. Alice got a bit bored though, so took her walking on the grass at the back of the church. She did enjoy her digestive biscuit from the church. Took the better part of an hour to finish it though.

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The afternoon fitted in a bit more wild activities. I keep well topped up bird feeders, but being 30 days time I thought I’d spoil them, so they’ve got the full range of options on the front and back garden feeders.

After Alice had her nap she joined me in the garden complete with her new explorer hat. We had bought her a watering can of her own a few days back, but hadn’t given it to her yet. She knew what to do with it straight away. She’s obviously watched me well. Didn’t give her any water yet though as didn’t fancy changing her just before tea.

I also added to the gardens wildlife provision planting the free seed mix that came with the 30 days pack and some night scented stock. It’s loved by moths apparently.

We finished off with tea on our new barbecue ticking the wild act food in the sunshine. Alice was a bit fractious though and wailed throughout taking some of the enjoyment away. Then she smeared beans on her new hat. Good job it looks like it’s easy to clean.

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Then managed a quick wild act while putting Alice to bed. The RSPB have an online petition placing nature on the agenda for the election. Only takes a minute to do if you feel inclined.

link

Now we’ve got an evening ahead of chilling watching fantastic beasts and where to find them. A rare night as parents we are going to try and sit down and watch a movie. I’ll leave this blog with a picture of my previously mentioned poppies that we’re looking nice today and a Bee enjoying a cornflower.

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Oldhouseintheshires

Stop the culls

https://petition.parliament.uk/petitions/165672

 

The news came yesterday that the government plans to continue and extend the badger culls into new counties. They have already taken place in Somerset and Gloucestershire since 2013 and in Dorset last year. The aim of the culls is to tackle bovine TB. Bovine TB is a serious issue for cattle farmers it affects thousands of farms and tens of thousands of cattle are culled each year as a result of it. There is a push to develop and approve vaccines for Bovine TB to vaccinate badgers and the cattle. However due to the expense and time this will take the culling option has been put forward as the main way of tackling the problem.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-37220043

So the culls have been going ahead which so far has been a very costly procedure.

A quick look at the figures:

2015 round of badger culling

Licensed culls in West Somerset, West Gloucestershire and Dorset

1,467

badgers culled in 2015

£1,779,000

total “badger control costs” for the year

  • £1,212.68 equivalent per badger culled
  • 743 badgers culled by “controlled shooting”
  • 724 badgers culled by cage trapping