Six on Saturday: 14.9.19 return of the rose

It seems to be the season of deadheading. The cosmos, dahlias and sweet peas are still going strong but need plenty of snipping to keep them going. The builders have returned to cap the wall so everything has come off the patio currently so it’s all a bit messy. Hopefully, they will get a move on with finishing the render so I can get pots off the lawn before they destroy it again. Onwards with this week’s six.

1. Bonsai-Golden larch-Pseudolarix

Before Alice was born I had a fairly successful bonsai that I’d kept going a few years. When I went on paternity it suffered and I never got it to recover. I thought it was time to try again. This time going for an outdoor variety. The golden larch isn’t a true larch but has bright yellow leaves before they drop.

2. Heuchera

My mum had bought me two new heucheras a few weeks back now. I decided to clump them near the path a these won’t spread as much as the ferns. They should behave themselves the foliage of lime marmalade contrasts beautifully with the dark forever purple. These are evergreen so they will give me some colour through Winter.

3. Cyclamen

The cyclamen have gone in the front garden. The white flowers standing out in the Northern shade of the house. While I bought them for the flowers I like the foliage of cyclamen too.

4 Geranium oxonianum

This was one of our wedding presents last year. It’s a small geranium but with very pretty small flowers.

5. Further fairies

Alice’s fairy garden efforts have continued with this fairy from Hull Bus Station. The bus station has a pretty decent florist with a good selection of garden and house plants.

6. Rose

This is the second flowering of the yellow rose this year and has become one of my favourites for its colour progression from bright flame buds to buttery flowers.

I’m off out for the day. Going to try and pop into the wildlife photographer of the year exhibit while I’m in Beverley. So I’ll catch up on everyone else’s six on Saturday blog later on.

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Six on Saturday: 7.9.19

Another week goes by and we are starting the slide down into Autumn. The weather is shifting. That said there is still plenty of colour in the garden. Last year I had several seasonal gaps but I seem to have managed better shifts between different flowers ending and starting this year. So onwards with this weeks Six on Saturday.

1. Butterflies

This year has seen a lot of butterflies in the garden. I don’t actually have a mass number of butterfly favourite flowers in the garden. The verbena is always popular but on the whole, I have more for bees so it has been good to see several species new to the garden this year. The small and large whites have been regular visitors but I think I’ve had them in larger numbers this year. I’ve found them one of the worst to photograph though as they don’t stay still so I was happy with these two shots where they’ve settled long enough to focus.


2. Dinosaur garden

Last week Alice worked on her fairy garden. This week she has built up her patio area with a dinosaur garden. She found this dinosaur at the beach. The shards of rock I’ve had laying around for a while and I’ve been intending to use in a succulent planter but they suit this well. The dwarf conifer I’ve had in a pot for a while not really doing much so it’d found a purpose.


3. Bargain Hostas

I walked past a church sale last week of pure tat but they also had some plants for sale at 50p each. So I filled my bags with as many hostas as I could carry.

These are probably going to be used for pots on the patio. I’ve potted a few up along with some I’ve had sat in their plastic pots for a while. From left to right the twisty foliage is dream weaver, then a blue leaved halcyon at the back, fortuneii at the front with the nibbled leaves, one of the church sales at the back, then blue mouse ears at the end. I’m thinking if use these for the patio it will link some of the front and back garden planting with lots of the same plants repeated throughout. I’m considering some bulbs around the pot edges for the start of the year. Maybe dwarf irises or Muscari that will die down as the hostas come back up.


4. Choisya

The choisya is having a second burst of flowers. The yellow rose that grows up out of this is looking like it might manage a second burst as well.


5. Nights drawing in

The nights are starting to draw in earlier. While I may well be glum about the lost time in the garden I’ve found some advantages. Sitting in our little new extension room I’ve found my garden seems to draw in the bats for the early evening. I can sit on the sofa and they are swooping right up to the windows. Wonderful to watch!


6. Dahlia, not Rebecca’s World

I bought this tuber from Thompson and Morgan. It was meant to be Rebecca’s world which is red and white. While Alice switched some labels and I don’t think she did with this one. But even is she did this doesn’t look like any I ordered as I went with almost all dark options. That said it is a stunner. The buds have a rich purple edging before it opens as a large white flower. The purple has gradually faded to pure white.

It looks like I still have a few more weeks of colour coming through but things are definitely on the wane. I’m pretty tired after my first week back at work. I’ve changed year groups at school and getting to grips with new routines. Luckily the little helper has been to hand to keep on top of the watering. Enjoy your weekends.

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Six on Saturday: 31.8.19

It’s almost the end of my Summer holiday and I’ve made good progress with the front garden. The front border is gradually filling up and the plants will fill out over the next year. The back garden has been neglected a bit but the dahlias and zinnias have filled this late Summer period well. I’m gradually building up to having a good level of seasonal interest throughout the year.

1. Gladioli

I’m not that keen on these gladioli and pulled a lot out last year but obviously didn’t get them all. They were bought as a cheap mix. They have reliably flowered each year and come out in the blousiest colours. They do add some late Summer colour which I appreciate, but I’d like more definite stronger colours.

2. Perennial sweet peas

These are next doors but they flop over Alice’s mud kitchen nicely. They come back each year and so long as I keep cutting they’ll keep flowering for a while. I didn’t manage to grow my own this year as we were limited for space for seed trays with the building work going on. These partially make up for it.

3. Fairy Gardens

I got criticised last week for not including my little star, so she’s back. She has been working on her fairy pot displays currently. She is rapidly becoming very girly. Everything has become all about the unicorns or the mermaids. She bought a fairy kit for her birthday a while back now. It came with grass seed which rapidly grew out of control and I have enough grass to cut without mowing the fairies lawn too. So the dying grass has come out to be replaced with sempervivums. I drilled a few holes but I’m not sure it has good enough drainage so we’ll see how it lasts but won’t look worse than the grass.

She then got a new fairy kit this week. She decided she wanted it the brightest pink in the pack. This one came from the Irish Fairy Door company. It’s a nice little kit with the door, paint, felt-tips and colouring book and special key. We only paid £4 for it though whereas it’s £16 online.

Then we glue gunned it to a pot and added stones around the door and she has set it up within a bucket planter. All her found objects have been put in. Acorns, conkers and pine cones. So it may have some odd seedlings in a few months. Then we put a few more sempervivums for flowers dotted around.

We also made it to garden village in Hull this week to see the fairy doors. Alice found her name along the avenue of trees.

And she got a ceramic toadstool to add to her garden.

4.Fern-Dryopteris

Part of my parents garden is being dug out for an extension. They kindly offered it to me. It is quite a beast. At about a metre heigh and similar spread, it took some digging. If I’m doing any more plant removing I need to remember my own tools. Spades are meant to be cutting tools not bludgeoning tools. For future reference here is a video on how to sharpen tools parents. I have been spoiled for nice tools over the last few birthdays and Christmas so have got used to top-notch tools. Though I do appreciate the fern it is looking grand in a shaded spot next to the lilac where little has thrived. I think it is probably some form of Dryopteris and will need well watering in for a while as this isn’t really the ideal time to be moving a plant of this size.

5. Nasturtium

I planted dairy maid last year. These have come up in the same spot but have flowered much brighter orange. So I’m not sure if these are the self-seeded offspring or something different. I did let Alice loose with some of the free magazine seeds that could be sown direct. So these could be the result of her random scattering as I think there were some nasturtiums amongst what I gave her. Next year there will also be poppies in places I haven’t planned. Keeps things interesting and ensures all spaces are filled. These are adding a nice bright burst where I’ve cut the lychnis back so I can see the sedum as it is coming into flower now.

6. Dahlia soulman

This dark beauty came as part of the Sarah Raven short dahlias for pots. I featured the other half last week. The growth has sprawled sideways out of its pot. These were meant to be short and not need staking, but perhaps a short stake might have helped tidy the growth. The flowers are stunning. It’s been one of the last to flower. It doesn’t currently have as many buds as others. but the few flowers I’ve got justify the effort.

It’s been a boiling week in the garden. The first proper week of Summer weather and now back to work. I’ve got a bit of work to do in the back garden. We’ve got two railway sleepers to make a step outside of the sliding doors. I’m not sure how well this will work but it didn’t cost much to get them and they can be used for something else if they don’t work there. Then the edge of the house has a gap of rubble. I was going to see if we can plant sempervivums into these spaces to tidy it up and suppress the weed growth.

Hope you’re enjoying your weekends and get some time to enjoy your gardens.

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Summer Holiday: Part 5-Peppa Pig world

Before we headed down we had checked out what was in the area and Paultons Park was high on our list of things we wanted to take Alice to. We wanted a few days we thought she’d really enjoy though I didn’t have high hopes of it being a great day but we knew she’d love it.

We had good fun on the rides. The park was busy but as there were quite a lot of rides we didn’t have massively long waits for anything. Even while waiting there was quite a lot for Alice to still look at. Alice was at just the right point where the rides were exciting but not too scary.

Alice enjoyed spinning Amy round on the Windy Castle balloons. Amy wasn’t as keen.

I don’t think life gets much better than riding a dinosaur.

We hired one of the buggies as we didn’t have our pram down on holiday with us. It came in use for piling the bags on and for Alice when she wanted a break from walking.

We did well with the weather. It rained for a short burst soaking everyone through. We’d brought our waterproof trousers which came in use and meant we had a period where the waiting time on rides dropped dramatically. Alice was miserable in the rain.

But quickly recovered.

The park also has animals dotted around. I enjoyed seeing them. Amy and Alice were too excited for Peppa.

Alice enjoyed meeting the characters.

She was most excited for George oddly.

The planting and gardens were excellent around the park. Almost worth the price of admission alone.

The hydrangeas were good though not up to Exbury Gardens level. But they have become the standard by which I am now judging all hydrangeas.

Dahlia love was strong.

And where else am I going to find Peppa topiary?

The main cafe and soft-play building had a spectacular green roof including vents on the roof that channelled the wind to cool inside.

I think Amy enjoyed the rides as much as Alice.

Alice sat with her souvenir of the day, Mr Dinosaur.

I didn’t have high hopes for Peppa Pig World, but we actually had a great day. The park was well organised. We didn’t have to pay for lots of hidden extras once we got in. The plants were fabulous. A lovely family day out.

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Summer Holiday: Part 4 Exbury Gardens

I have already discussed the wonders of the gardens in a previous six on Saturday blog but there was plenty I didn’t include so here is a bit more about the day.

When we first arrived we had a short period of time before we got on the steam train so Alice had a quick play in the playground. She is getting more and more adventurous.

She initially wanted help on the rope then told us to stand back.

The train gave us views of the dragonfly ponds and the rock garden which we didn’t manage to walk to.

Alice enjoyed spotting the sculptures.

Walking backwards is great fun.

Constant snacking is vital for taking a three-year-old anywhere.

I talked about the amazing hydrangeas and many of the other plants in the previous blog on Exbury but didn’t give much space to the acers/maples that I was also taken by. It’s a popular garden option that I struggle to grow because of the wind scorch. Over the last few months, I’ve bought a number to try in my own garden. Acer Butterfly is still doing well, but several of the others have suffered a bit. Getting the balance between giving them shelter and being able to see them is tough with my conditions. Here are a few from Exbury.

I heard plenty of birds during the day but didn’t see many through the thick woodland canopy but did see a good number of fluffy robins.

It was a superb garden and I still have plenty more photos I haven’t shown but these hydrangeas are worth revisiting. Hope you’ve enjoyed the extra shots.

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Summer Holiday: Part 3-Christchurch

Last time we visited Dorset we never visited Christchurch centre despite staying in Christchurch. So this time we decided to rectify this. The town developed around the river and priory established in 1094. The castle was started in the 12th century, then destroyed during the civil war. It became a smuggling hot spot during the 18th and 19th century and seems to have brought in quite a bit of wealth as there are lots of fine buildings from this period.

We spent the morning at soft play as there were weather warnings for the wind so it seemed prudent to stay inside. We arrived early when it wasn’t too busy but by the time we left, it was becoming a bit Lord of the Flies.

We took the bus so we could both have a little holiday drink with lunch. Alice doesn’t go on buses very often as we walk everywhere in Hornsea so she was entertained by the novelty. Google maps have proved very useful this holiday as it shows how many more stops to go.

We had a wander around the Priory. The Priory has many interesting stories around it but I think the miraculous beam was my favourite. The story dates to the 12th century that a beam was hoisted in place and it was found to be short. This would have caused some embarrassment. There had been a lone carpenter who had eaten and worked alone. The following day the carpenters returned and the beam fitted. The mysterious lone carpenter was never seen again. The miracle of the beam was put down to a miracle of Jesus Christ as the son of a carpenter.

Alice pretended to be her granddad.

It was a bit windy back outside.

We had brought some food to feed the ducks and swans.

The war memorial has a fine rose garden around it.

From the river and Priory, it was a short walk around to the ruins of the castle.

Alice wasn’t keen on being locked in the stocks, but she was happy to put Amy in.

We had a good platter in the Thomas Tripp pub.

While Alice was kept entertained in the traditional way of her generation.

It didn’t keep her attention for long though before she wanted cuddles.

Then Alice got a little treat from the chocolatier on the way to the bus.

We had a good day out in Christchurch and made the most of a weather warning day where we didn’t want to travel far.

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Summer Holiday: Part 2-Highcliffe Castle

After our starting point of Guildford, we moved onto house sit in Christchurch for our Summer holiday. Our first day out was to Highcliffe Castle. Highcliffe Castle was built in the 1830s by Charles Stuart, 1st Baron Stuart de Rothesay. The gardens were designed by Capability Brown though only part of this survives. The house changed hands ending up the property of the Catholic Church in the 1950s. It was bought by local businessmen in the 1960s before much was damaged by fire. The castle deteriorated into ruin before it was bought on by compulsory purchase from the local council.  The grounds and beach were opened to the public but it was too expensive to restore the house. Heritage Lottery funding allowed restoration to take place in the 90s.

When we arrived wedding photos were taking place but Alice was too eager to run through the passages in the hedges.

Inside the castle was good for kids with lots for Alice to do. Many of the displays were interactive with sound for her to listen to. She enjoyed playing in the kitchen serving everyone food.

She looked quite good as a maid but didn’t keep it on long enough for a decent photo.

She meticulously stacked up the rectangles to fill a stained glass light box. She didn’t want anyone else having the rectangles!

She did some very careful tracing.

Then very careful colouring upstairs.

There was a gallery of street art on. Most wasn’t to my taste but some caught my eye.

More dressing up upstairs.

The inevitable icecream.

She had a good climb outside between rain.

Then a bit of a stroll of the grounds before she had a meltdown as her clothes were wet.

The grounds are mainly made up of woodland.

Highcliffe was a good spot to visit for a family. Quite a number of activities for the kids to do as they go round. Alice enjoyed herself. There is a stroll down to Avon Beach but she isn’t quite ready to walk that far. In my next blog, we visited Christchurch, then still more of Exbury, Peppa Pig World and the Gruffalo to come.

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