Six on Saturday: 7.8.21

This is a prerecorded episode of six on Saturday. We will be on our way back from a week in Dorset today. So, this week’s six was written just before we left last week. Hopefully the garden will still be looking good with the flowers that are on the verge of opening still on show. Rain was forecast so hopefully it won’t be too dry.

  1. Digitalis lutea

I grew this perennial variety of foxglove last year from seed. They are now flowering. They are much shorter than the more common purpurea. Measuring between 30cm and 50cm with small white flowers. They don’t seem to be popular with any of the wildlife in the way the Digitalis purpurea is but they have the advantage of being short lived perennials rather than biennial so I don’t have to keep regrowing them every single year.

2. Lythrum salicaria ‘Robin’

This perennial has been shifted around the border multiple times. I’ve not quite found a space it fits with the plants around it. It forms woody spires with little pink tubular flowers. It is meant to be a bog plant or marginal plant for a pond but it seems to have been happy enough in our clay soil. It would probably look better if I had a few more patches of it along the border. It is getting towards division point this year so I think I’ll try splitting it and spreading it along the border for repetition.

The smaller bees love it, so while it isn’t the most amazing looking plant it is serving a purpose within our wildlife gardening efforts.

3. Calendula ‘snow princess’

This is a self seeded calendula that I think is probably the offspring of snow princess. It is very pale, almost white. It has found its way into the shade of the hydrangeas and Acer. The paleness means it stands out quite well in the shade.

4. Iris foetidissma ‘Paul’s Gold’

Iris foetidissma is one of our two native irises. It is usually used as a shade plant. once established it is usually a survivor. The flowers are small and lillac. Pretty but not that eye grabbing in the way most irises are. It is more commonly grown for the leaves and seeds. These are evergreen and provide spikes through winter. The seeds stay attached to the plant through winter providing colour. They are usually red or orange though a white variety ‘fructo alba’ has been cultivated. Paul’s gold has been bred for the yellow strap leaves. It is essentially the same as aurea which has the smae yellow leaves. The leaves stand out in a semi-shaded spot. I don’t actually like it as much as the wild form but I’m becoming interested in the possibilities of hybridization so it’s good to have a few cultivars.

5. Hydrangea paniculata ‘little lime’

This is a smaller version of the popular limelight. I have grown it in a pot where it is thriving. As you can see, it’s covered in flowers. The majority of the cone is sterile but the ends contain nectar for the insects. It is usually popular with the butterflies but it has been too wet for them the last few day.

And a close up of a cone.

6. Dahlia, possibly Addison June

I think this is probably Addison June but as normal lables have been removed by either Alice or the birds. Amy and Alice chose this one back in April sales. It is a striking one, though I usually avoid the ruffles as they are less use for pollinators. But it was their choice so there you go. It’s the first of this years dahlias to flower. I haven’t grown many this year as so many returned last year. But, it’s looking like the slugs have eaten most in the border. But the three I’ve got should bring plenty of colour. I got fed up dead heading last year so at least I won’t have as much to do.

Hope you’ve enjoyed this week’s six. Hopefully we have managed some garden visits on our trip down south that I can feature next week.

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8 thoughts on “Six on Saturday: 7.8.21”

    1. The lythrum is actually a pain to get any photos of insects on. It’s many small flowers and they don’t stop on it for any length of time. It almost didn’t feature as I was struggling to photograph it. But it’s a popular one with the smaller bees.

      Liked by 1 person

  1. I really like little lime hydrangea. The green colour of the flowers is rather pretty. The Lythrum is a new plant for me, and what a beauty! We have a lot of clay in our garden, so it might be an ideal plant for me. I will investigate further.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. There are lots of more feral lythrums but this seems to have a good balance between ornamental and wildlife benefits. I like the little lime. The larger version is often a bit bare around the base so needs plants to surround whereas this seems to spread more. Good for a pot.

      Liked by 1 person

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