Six on Saturday: 5.10.19-bulbs and peat-free

We enter a new month and Autumn is definitely upon us now. The leaves are changing colour or falling. As I live by the sea I often don’t get to enjoy the change in colour as it often goes from Summer to the leaves blown straight off. But the dogwood and hydrangeas are doing good impressions of Autumn currently. Much of Autumn gardening ends up being about tidying or preparing for Spring. The bulb planting has begun in earnest now. The garden has taken a battering the last week with rain and wind. A few plants have flopped under the weight of the rain and a few snapped. But that’s fine as the winter foliage plants stand out more and I do like my ferns and heucheras.

1. Iris reticulata

I have got round to planting the iris discussed in previous posts. I enjoyed my irises this year and vowed to get more. I am trying growing the iris in the same pots as the hostas. The idea being the iris will flower, then die down as the hosta come back up. Time will tell whether this was a good plan. I’ve got two varieties so far. The classic Harmony and Katherine Hodgson. I went with the Katherine Hodgson in one of the taller hosta pots and then the harmony are spread over two of the pots filled with the 50p hostas bought a few weeks back.

2. Clematis

Thompson and Morgan had another of their flash sales on clematis. So I now have 4 more clematises. Clematis winter beauty was one of the main ones I wanted. It’s an evergreen variety with small white bell-shaped flowers in winter. Amy doesn’t want ivy but I want evergreen climbers so I’ve been working through the options. Clematis Kokone is a ruffly purple variety that flowers in Summer. I’m split between trying this up the fence in one of the few remaining spaces or to try it up one of the trees. The Florida ‘Taiga’ and ‘green apple’ I want to try in pots growing up obelisks. But I need to find a decent-sized pot for this to work.

3. Butterfly-comma

Last weekend saw, what I think is, my first sighting of a comma butterfly in my garden. I haven’t seen these much in my areas since a brownfield area was bought for housing development. A welcome sighting. This butterfly went through a rapid decline and then has steadily come back in the south of the UK but has been working its way North. The caterpillars feed on nettles, but will also feed on willows and hops. I don’t have hops or willows but there are plenty of nettles in the back passage behind the garden so hopefully, these could become a regular feature.

4. Cosmos

The cosmos combined with dahlia have looked stunning for a good month, but the wind and rain has flattened and snapped many stems. It’s been nice while it lasted. But removing the patch reveals the evergreen ferns that will keep the garden structure through winter. I’m cutting down to the snapped stems, so I may still get some more flowers but not as grand a display as I’ve been enjoying. On the bright side, a bit less deadheading to do.

5. Buxus sempervivums

I recently discovered a local company, The Little Green Plant Factory, selling plants reared peat-free, plastic-free and chemical-free. The plants are very well priced. With all the ethical boxes ticked I needed to give them a try. I ordered two box shrubs. These were a good price. Just little specimens currently but look well-rooted and healthy. The plants came packed in cardboard in biodegradable pots with wool weed suppressant on the top. They were wrapped in straw for protection. I’m planning to grow these in pots on the patio to act as wind buffs for the less hardy plants. While only little currently they will grow quickly enough. I’m thinking square planters for this. I’ve never really grown topiary before so I’m only aiming for rough domes. A lot of the plants listed on the site are not currently available as they are growing but I’m interested to follow the progress of this company.

I actually drive through the village where this is based but currently mail order based. Though they do offer £1 delivery to Beverley for anyone local.

6. Passionflower-Snow queen

My second purchase from “The little green plant factory” has been another passionflower. This time a white variety. This was a crossbreed between the hardy caerula and white wedding. It has gone a little further along the fence from the existing passionflower. I’m hoping it has enough time to settle into its position before winter, but I’ll give it a good mulch to protect the roots to be on the safe side. In bad winters they can be killed back but will regrow from the ground. It had a decent bit of growth on it and several buds. This has the advantage over the popular Constance Elliot of having larger blooms that stay open longer. It has a few flower buds on but I don’t know if it will be sunnier or warm enough to flower this year but fingers crossed.

Hope you’ve enjoyed this weeks six and peoples gardens are holding up alright against the onslaught of the weather. I’ve had a Gee-Tee bulb delivery of 200 croci. 100 white for the front garden and 100 mixed for the back but don’t know that I’ll have time to plant them but we’ll see. Even if I can just get some in that will cut the workload. But no great rush on these. They can wait a bit longer.

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18 thoughts on “Six on Saturday: 5.10.19-bulbs and peat-free”

  1. Just looked at Little Green Plant Factory. If things are to change we have to support people like this not just buy it from Morrisons because it’s dirt cheap and convenient. Controversial? It shouldn’t be.

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    1. Its all well priced. I might not get the range but it’s local to me and ethical. Add my own efforts growing from seed and from cuttings and dramatically cut the waste and damage from much of the large scale commercial growth. But as I’m now up to the point where I’ve got most of my large shrubs established my garden is gradually becoming more about annuals from seeds and dividing plants.

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  2. Seeing the flower buds of your passionflower, I think you should see them bloom at least once before winter. Mine have finished their season, their leaves are turning yellow and I’m going to bring them home in my attic because they are tropical varieties.
    Nice blue tit shot Joshua, as always.

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    1. My track record on clematis isn’t great. One group 3 that came with the garden. It was leggy so cut it to the ground and 3 years on doing well. Then a Montana that does well but Montana’s are supposed to be bomb proof.
      The evergreen I’m trying as wife won’t allow ivy so working my through evergreen options to give me a fence of green. The others are more exotic looking.

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  3. Love the cosmos/dahlia bed. Really gorgeous. I visited the Little Green Plant Factory site & really like her ethos. She’s excelled in all her work, it would seem & yet the plants are so reasonably priced. I do hope the passionflower blooms for you this year cuz I’d love to see it in action.

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  4. Supporting local nurseries is the way to go I think. I try to avoid the garden centre chain company nearby except for pots and compost and next year I want to avoid mail order too as much as possible though the specialist nurseries are usually very good. Love your Blue Tit and the Comma butterfly Joshua.

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    1. Yes, I’m now getting to a point where the borders are rammed. The main shrubs and backbone of the garden are in so can grow much from seed and cuttings and avoid the peat and inflated prices of my local chain garden centre.

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