Invite a tree for tea

The woodland trust invite a tree for tea pack is back again. I used it last year with my class to learn about trees. The pack last year had a nice little ID guide, some games, treasure hunt. The pack this year again looks good. The premise is basic; trees are vital to us. But they are under threat, so the tree party is celebrating the value of trees, while raising money and awareness for the Woodland Trust.

_DSC0303

 

School garden

This week the gardening club have helped dig over the last of the plots. They’ve planted tomatoes, beans, chillies and courgettes. The children keep asking are the courgettes bananas, so probably a a good thing for them to see growing. There a bit wilted at the moment, but if I let the F2s in to water a few times next week they’ll flourish in no time.

 photo IMG_1459_zps2xvzsgel.jpg

While in the garden we had a drafonfly visiting. This fascinated the kids. Looking in the field guide I think it’s possibly a common darter. The lavender is bringing in the bees and seeing quite a few ladybirds in too.

We had a local authority visit come to check my provision in my Foundation Stage. We got a positive report, commenting how children were focussed and how much mark making was going on outside. A lot of the boys were mark making too. In a city where this is an issue that was nice to hear. The outdoor provision has been my focus, so nice to know it’s improving.

Weekends in gardens

On Sunday we headed out to my parents for lunch.

 photo _DSC0207_zpsdhlkf0bp.jpg

Alice a nice time in her ladybird tent.

 photo _DSC0213_zpsssvb7vsg.jpg

 photo _DSC0225_zpszlrxnt2l.jpg

Alice enjoyed watering the flowers.

 photo _DSC0220_zpsowjcpvge.jpg

 photo _DSC0209_zpsyfoxdhjh.jpg

The bees enjoyed the passion flowers.

 photo _DSC0216_zps8wgfzelb.jpg

Then we went onto Amy’s sisters for her birthday. Lots of red admirals were out and about and a few moths.

 photo _DSC0235_zps17yuyydf.jpg

 photo _DSC0229_zpsnthymskd.jpg

Alice was excited to go on the trampoline. Although her feelings were mixed when on.

 photo _DSC0239_zpsegdvtxzh.jpg

 photo _DSC0240_zpst7dqmqvn.jpg

The youngsters altogether.

 photo _DSC0249_zpscwhawaj1.jpg

In my own garden the butterfly house is seeing visitors. Bananas I put out during 30 days are now attracting red admirals. They like their fruit matured a few weeks. So if you are looking to do the butterfly count leave fruit out now to over ripen.

 photo _DSC0252_zpsxwbgvgao.jpg

 photo _DSC0253_zpsrf6wx3u1.jpg

Bridleway exploring

In every walk with nature one receives far more than he seeks.
John Muir

Yesterday had seen an unsettled night with Alice. She stubbornly refused to sleep on her own, so ended up resting on me until half 12. Then her morning nap was much the same. Thrashing and wailing all over the place. We don’t know if it’s teething, a reaction to the measles jab or something else and she doesn’t oblige by telling us. So I gave up on trying to put her down to take her out for some quiet time, pushing her around in the pram. Unlike many babies she doesn’t fall asleep that often in the pram. But I thought some time with her sat still might give her the rest she needed.

I head out round to the new housing estate. On the edge is a path taking you between what I think are wheat fields. The paths are pretty much only frequented by dog walkers.

 photo _DSC0137_zpsfgldpfvx.jpg

 photo _DSC0139_zpsk9ina2jl.jpg

Along the edge of the path, in the wildflowers, I saw a number of ladybirds. Some were native I believe, rather than the usual harlequins I see.

 photo _DSC0148_zpsp2atizu3.jpg

A lot of ringlets and red admiral butterflies criss crossed the verges.

 photo _DSC0159_zpsegkbtdtu_edit_1498942283178_zpsew1nsqy2.jpg

The slugs and snails have been out all over the last week with the heavy rain, but now it’s starting to dry out they are making a retreat.

 photo _DSC0152_zpsasz1qe0k.jpg

I took the footpath past the bunker. This path takes you through an overgrown area of brambles, bindweed, nettles and trees. It is a have for a whole variety of wildlife. Previously I discovered many robins and bluebells. On the walk up to it I passed a buddleja covered in red admirals.

 photo _DSC0165_zps40oluugp.jpg

The bunker is apparently a favourite kids play spot, which is nice that it can now act as a hideout den.

 photo _DSC0170_zps8hl12ss5.jpg

Around the bunker honeysuckle is starting to flower.

 photo _DSC0169_zpsj2c2cxg4.jpg

While walking along this stretch one of the dog walkers recommended a bridleway a little further out of town. A bridleway, for those who are unsure, is defined a path for horses. Motor vehicles are not generally allowed access and they are not for the movement of livestock. Walkers can use them and cyclists, although cyclists are meant to give right of way to others. While cyclists are allowed to use them there is no local authority obligation to maintain them to be suitable for bikes. The path was not overly suitable for the pram and at times was hard going. It did however bounce Alice around enough to put her to sleep, which is what I was hoping would happen. I wouldn’t recommend it as a pram walk though, but I was lucky that the ground was dry and the grass at a length I could push through.

 photo _DSC0191_zps5g9arbzx.jpg

The bridleway was a lovely route with fields either side, with house martins swooping over, butterflies, bees and hoverflies flitting along the edge. The path gently rolled upwards back to one of the roads out of Hornsea. I didn’t see another soul along the whole stretch.

 photo _DSC0180_zpse0srvcpw.jpg

A hoverfly on the nettles.

 photo _DSC0178_zpsewqvvg3l.jpg

A small tortoiseshell.

 photo _DSC0181_zpstjjv0qxe_edit_1498941130619_zpsk99s6bud.jpg

What I think is possibly a reed bunting. This is a new sighting to me to the area. I haven’t spent much time exploring the local farmland routes. As mentioned the pram is not really designed for this, but as Alice gets walking further we can get to know these paths better.

 photo _DSC0183_zpsfmht2ijb_edit_1498942027346_zps48uv8m1q.jpg

Damselflies mating at the end of the path.

 photo _DSC0187_zpsmaiy469e_edit_1498941967455_zpsieff13gn.jpg

On the way back home I spotted gull chicks venturing out of their nest on a roof.

 photo _DSC0192_zpsjvtjkwl8.jpg

As Alice was still sleeping I took a little detour through the park to give her longer sleeping.

 photo _DSC0194_zpslajelnms.jpg

 photo _DSC0193_zpsruvgtsb6.jpg

I even spotted some mysterious activities going on at the town hall. They’ve possibly come to unmask local MP Graham Stuart.

 photo _DSC0199_zpsquyw14fk.jpg

So Alice got a decent sleep in the end and I’ve found out about a new path and seen some new wildlife. A good trip out. I’ll finish with a photo of the hebe I got for my birthday. It’s flowering now and is a lovely colour. The bees are loving it.

Bee 4

Kindle gardening book deals

Kindle seems to of decided that this is a good month for gardening books. There are three RHS books on offer currently.

RHS gardening for mindfulness

A book encouraging you to slow down and appreciate the garden.

RHS small garden handbook

While my garden isn’t tiny I still like to hear advice for small spaces. Were working out what to do with the patio area, so may get some useful tips here.

RHS big ideas:small spaces

Again this may give me some ideas for the patio. It looks like a rockery planter on the cover. Having planted a few alpines recently to please Amy I think she’d like something like that.

The last recommendation isn’t RHS. Margery Fish-cottage gardens. Coincidentally Margery Fish was discussed on Gardner’s World this week. My mixed border and mix of self seeders would be approved of by Margery. I have a number of her favourites growing. From a few wild flowers on the walls, foxgloves and hollyhocks to the geraniums. I think this book will be well suited to my haphazard mix.

 photo _DSC0140_zpsttbe95uy.jpg

 photo fc94a281-b9a5-4d72-b754-0f3e8b0c9ecc_zpspqbvlluv.jpg